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  • Author or Editor: C. P. Meyer x
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Abstract

Equipment for measuring water use of a greenhouse crop of up to ± 1 kg h-1 over 30 m2 is described. It is based on growing a crop in nutrient film, with a nutrient tank replenished from a water tank, and controlled by accurate level sensors. The water tank is suspended from a load cell interrogated at frequent intervals by a data logging computer. Examples of data collected are given. Peak daytime transpiration rates varied from 50 mg s-1 m-2 to 150 mg m2 s-1 with a maximum error of 5%. With low transpiration rates, the errors were increased, but accuracy could be improved by calculating the rates over a prolonged time interval.

Open Access

An online survey was conducted to investigate the current practices of and challenges for turfgrass breeders and turfgrass seed distributors (or sales staff) in the United States. We found that turfgrass seed breeders rated producers/growers and consumers as more important parties compared with other interested parties. However, variations in ratings were found for breeders/distributors according to different program characteristics. The volume of seed sales of the species was the most highly rated technical consideration for both breeders and distributors. Compared with distributors, breeders considered the following technical factors more important than others: funding, labor, field trial performance, diversity in working priorities, availability of germplasms, scheduling, and staff training. Costs, followed by resource allocation and resource availability, were rated as the most challenging factors when breeders were implementing priorities. Our findings provide important insight regarding breeding and distribution practices and management in the turfgrass industry.

Free access

The development and evaluation of new turfgrass cultivars require considerable resources. A systematic understanding of the breeders’ and distributors’ trait selection behavior can provide a basis for making adjustments and improvements based on industry needs and thus accelerate the breeding process and make it more efficient. The objective of this study is to investigate the selection priorities for turfgrass traits and identify the most influential factors affecting turfgrass breeders’ and distributors’ likelihood of selecting turfgrass traits. Results show that the most important trait clusters for both breeders and distributors were abiotic stress resistance and growth characteristics. Breeders were more likely than distributors to select appearance traits when setting trait priorities. Program characteristics such as program size, education level, and being a male respondent had positive effects on the reported likelihood of selecting studied turfgrass traits, and these effects varied for different trait clusters.

Free access