Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: C. M. Howard x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Fruit and calyx of four strawberry clones (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, B, and Cu content for 2 seasons. The elemental concn varied because of the year, the clone, and the time of season. The concn of the elements in the fruit decreased in the following order: K, N, P, Ca, Mg, Fe, B, Mn, Zn, and Cu. The elemental concn was greater in the calyx than in the fruit; probably as a result of the much higher dry weight content of the calyx. The total elemental content in kg/ha of the fruit and calyx for a season ranged as follows: K from 40 to 67, N from 33 to 49, P from 6 to 9, Ca from 5.4 to 7.5, Mg from 3.7 to 5.7, Fe from 0.11 to 0.15, Mn from 0.05 to 0.10, B from 0.04 to 0.09, Zn from 0.04 to 0.06, and Cu from 0.012 to 0.016.

Open Access

Abstract

The accumulation of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and B were determined at transplanting, first flowering, first harvest, middle of harvest season, and end of harvest season to ascertain the extent and the pattern of plant nutrient uptake in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.). The plants were grown with the annual hill cultural system and mulched with polyethylene. More accumulation of each element occurred during harvest than before that time. Excluding harvested fruit, leaves accumulated the most N, P, K, and Mg; the roots and crown the most Fe and Zn, while the dead material accumulated the most Ca. Harvested fruit accumulated more N, P, K, and B than did the plant. The caluclated average seasonal accumulation of the 9 elements in the plant and in the harvested fruit during the 2 seasons in kg/ha were: K 63.1, N 58.6, Ca 30.8, P 9.4, Mg 7.8, Fe 0.456, Mn 0.161, Zn 0.088, and B 0.077.

Open Access

Abstract

Subjecting harvested transplants of strawberry (Fragaria X ananassa Duch. cvs. Florida Belle and Dover) to excessive wilting increased foliage loss and plant mortality and reduced plant size and January fruit yields.

Open Access

Abstract

Using the annual hill cultural system, runners of 2 strawberry cultivars were removed twice monthly, monthly, or left on the plants during each of 2 seasons. An additional treatment was the transplanting of runners into the planting slits of the original transplants followed by removal of the original transplants when the runners became established. ‘Tufts’ produced 2 to 8 times more runners than ‘Dover’, over a 2 to 3 month period instead of one month as with ‘Dover’. Early marketable yields of ‘Tufts’ were reduced each season when runners remained attached to the fruiting plants, and the total marketable yield was reduced for the 2nd season as well. Yields were reduced because of fewer marketable-size fruit. ‘Dover’ yields were unaffected by runner removal treatments. Early and total marketable fruit yields of the runner plants of both cultivars were reduced each season compared to other treatments. Early yields of ‘Dover’ were greater than those of ‘Tufts’.

Open Access

Abstract

A3 × 3 factorial study of soil and foliar-applied N, P, and K fertilizer was conducted on ‘Dover’ and ‘Tufts’ strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) using the annual hill cultural system. Rates of soil-applied fertilizer were: a) 0, b) 112N-12P-93K, and c) 224N-24P-186K (kg·ha−1). Rates of weekly foliar fertilizer applications were a) 0, b) 1.20N–0.54P–1.02K, and c) 2.40N–1.08P-2.04K (kg·ha−1). Increasing rates of soil-applied fertilizer increased fruit yields, fruit number, foliar N and K, plant size, and foliage color. Rates of foliar N, P, and K had much less effect than soil-applied fertilizer. The greatest plant response to foliar fertilization was with inadequate rates of soil fertilizer. Foliage damage was evident with foliar fertilization, and damage was greatest with the highest foliar rate.

Open Access

Abstract

Strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) were grown for 3 seasons on a well-drained fine sand which received 0, 4.5, 9, 18, and 36 metric tons (MT)/ha of poultry manure annually. Fruit yields increased each season with increased rates of manure up to 18 MT/ha. The 36 MT/ha rate caused a foliage burn during the first 3 seasons which may have reduced yields. Considerable leaching of the soluble nutrients from manure to and below the 60-cm soil depth occurred from season to season. Analyses of saturated soil extracts indicated that concentrations of soluble salts, K, and NO3–N increased with increasing rates of manure at all 4 depths to 60 cm. The Ca, K, and Mg concentrations at all 4 soil depths increased with increased manure rates and generally decreased with depth. Organic matter content of the surface 15 cm of the soil increased with increased manure rate. Soil pH was only slightly affected by the manure treatments.

Open Access

Abstract

Plant density of okra (Hibiscus esculentus L. cv. Clemson Spineless) was varied from 16, 32, to 64 plants/m2 using 1 or 2 rows/bed and 2.5 or 5 cm in the row spacing. Yield per unit area increased linearly with plant density on a double logarithmic scale. Plant density and pod size were inversely related while the percent marketable pods were unaffected by treatments. The fertility rate did not affect yield responses, but the higher rate increased soil soluble salts, K, and NO3.

Open Access

Abstract

Bio-degradeable paper mulches with a polyethylene (PE) coating on both sides or with a single PE coating applied against the soil surface satisfactorily endured Florida's 7 month growing season and gave similar fruit yields and fertilizer leaching results as compared to black PE mulch. Paper mulch was harder to transplant through since it is less flexible than PE mulch, but it does not have to be removed from the Geld at season's end.

Open Access

Abstract

Defoliation of Florida-grown plants of 2 strawberry cultivars at transplanting to simulate leaf desiccation damage which may occur during and after transplanting retarded growth and reduced yields. Fruit no. was linearly correlated with fruit yield while the marketable wt per fruit was unaffected by treatments.

Open Access

Abstract

Okra (Hibiscus esculentus L. cv. Clem son Spineless) and sweet pepper(Capsicum annuum L. cv. Yolo Wonder L)were grown at 2 fertility levels with treatments of full bed mulch, strip mulch, and bare soil. A black paper coated on both sides with a thin layer of clear polyethylene was used as mulch. Germination of okra and the early growth and seasonal marketable yield of both vegetables were greatest with the full bed mulch treatment. The strip mulch treatments increased yield of pepper over that of the unmulched but had little effect on okra yield. Yields were always higher with the higher fertility level, but differences were usually not significant. Pepper fruit size and no. and okra pods per plant were increased by mulch treatment. As amount of bed covered by mulch increased so did the soil NO3 and K. Higher fertilizer rates generally increased soil NO3 and K but differences were significant only in 1972.

Open Access