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  • Author or Editor: C. G. Woodbridge x
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Abstract

Peas were grown for 4 generations in B-free culture solutions in a glasshouse before B-deficiency symptoms appeared. The B-deficient seedlings were stunted, the internodes shorter, the leaves smaller and paler, and the pods seedless and smaller than similar plants growing in 0.1 and 0.5 ppm B culture solutions. Abnormal venation was common on leaflets and stipules and was frequently associated with a multi-tipped leaf structure. The tips of the leaves were pointed and many developed into tendril-like structures. The B content of peas from B-deficient plants was 3-5 ppm while that of non-deficient plants was 11-13 ppm. In non-deficient plants it accumulated in the stem and leaves. In the 0.5 ppm B solutions these tissues contained over 170 ppm while in the B-deficient plants they contained only 10-18 ppm.

Open Access

Abstract

Analysis of normal and split-pit fruit of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) both glasshouse and field grown, failed to show any consistent relationship between nutrient levels and the presence or severity of the disorder over a 3-year period. Differences in Ca and B concentrations in gravel culture did not affect pit splitting. In the glasshouse experiment B was always higher in split-pit fruit but for field grown fruit this relationship did not hold. P, K, Ca, Mg and B were uniformly distributed throughout the fruit flesh.

Open Access

Abstract

Leaves of ‘Bartlett’ pear trees on seedling roots generally had higher levels of N, P, K, and Cu but lower Mg than leaves from trees on quince roots. Differences in Ca, S, B, Fe, Mn, and Zn levels were variable. The trunk cross-sectional areas of interstocks on seedling roots were larger than those of ‘Bartlett’ scions on seedling roots. No differences in bloom dates or fruit quality and characteristics were associated with rootstocks.

Open Access

Abstract

Low Ca level was found to be associated with the incidence of the fruit disorders “cork” or “pit” in ‘Beurre ‘d’Anjou’ (‘Anjou’) and “black end” in ‘Bartlett’ pear. Differences in the Ca level of normal and affected fruits were greatest in the peel and the stem portion of the core for ‘Anjou’ cork, and in the core portions for black end. Mg levels were not well correlated with either disorder. Affected fruit usually had higher levels of K and B than did normal fruit.

Open Access

Abstract

The influence of some growth hormones and regulators on the pattern of 45Ca absorption and translocation was determined on young pea and bean plants. GA3 (20 ppm) and TIBA (30 ppm) depressed 45Ca absorption in both species. IAA (20 ppm) and SADH (1500 ppm) increased 45Ca translocation to bean shoots, but depressed translocation to pea shoots. None of the substances materially altered retention of 45Ca in the roots of either species. When differences in translocation to the shoots were observed, they were not correlated with growth responses evoked by the growth regulators.

Open Access

Abstract

Shoots of 2-week old rooted cuttings of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ram cv. Bright Golden Anne were kept at 18-23°C while roots were maintained at 18-23°, 16°, 10°, and 4° for 2 weeks. Roots at 16° or lower reduced N while 10° or lower reduced P. K, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu decreased with decreasing root temperature while Ca increased and Mg levels varied.

Open Access

Abstract

Boron was applied to the surface of 3 southern Washington soils at rates of 0, 3.4, 6.7, and 13.4 kg/ha. Levels of hot-water-extractable B were measured annually to a depth of 90 cm for 3-5 years following application. Soils ranged from medium to high in B retention capacity. Once the B retention capacity of the soils was satisfied, additional B leached readily through the profile. The same amounts of B were applied to the same soil types in 3 commercial pear orchards to determine the effects on plant uptake. Blossom, leaf, and fruit levels of ‘Bartlett’ pear (Pyrus communis L.) were little affected by the applications, even though the extractable soil B levels were high. This failure to obtain uptake may be explained by dry soil conditions and reduced root activity resulting from low rainfall and low soil temperatures.

Open Access

Abstract

Fruit buds of pear, apple and cherry, collected between the late dormant period and petal fall, were separated into their various parts and analyzed for B. Generally, the B content of the tissues reflected the amount in the soil. Total B increased gradually as the bud enlarged and then rapidly as the flower opened to full bloom. In many of the flower parts the B level was high. During the bloom period, the blossom parts (styles, petals, sepals, anthers, filaments and receptacles) contained more B than the leaves and pedicels.

Open Access

Abstract

Fifty plant introduction lines of pepper were screened for resistance to curly top virus using the vector Circulifer tenellus Baker and a strain of virus known to be pathogenic on peppers Inoculations were done by caging either 3 or 15 viruliferous leafhoppers onto a leaf at the 4-true-leaf stage of growth. Four lines (PI 257053, PI 281297, PI 288938, and PI 357522) showed apparent resistance when inoculated by 3 leafhoppers, but non appeared resistant for more than a few days when inoculated by 15 leafhoppers. No correlation was found between leafhopper longevity on a plant and that plant’s resistance to the virus.

Open Access

Abstract

Yellow or blond peas are a serious problem during some years for growers and processors of dark green peas grown for freezing in the Pacific Northwest. Previous reports (6, 10) indicate that most yellow peas in varieties grown for freezing result from insufficient light reaching the developing ovules before they have reached half-size. The senior author has found (unpublished data) that off-color peas are usually in the lower shaded pods and that gibberellin applied at full bloom resulted in more vegetative growth, lodging, and yellow peas.

Open Access