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  • Author or Editor: C. G. Wang x
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Abstract

Fruit of ‘Spartan’ apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees treated in April with paclobutrazol maintained greater firmness and had less internal breakdown than control fruit after 7 months in storage at 0°C. However, ACC level, ethylene production, respiration, soluble solids, sorbitol, fructose, glucose, sucrose, and malic acid content of the fruit after 0° storage and during ripening at 20° were not affected. Chemical names used: β-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H- 1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol); 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC).

Open Access
Authors: and

Postharvest applications of polyamines reduced chilling injury of McIntosh apples and zucchini squash. McIntosh apples developed brown core, a symptom of chilling injury, after 5 months of storage at 0°C. However, this disorder was absent in fruit infiltrated with putrescine, spermidine, or spermine. Polyamine treatments also reduced softening of fruit tissue. Pressure infiltration of zucchini squash with spermine immediately after harvest reduced the severity of surface pitting during subsequent storage at 2.5°C. The elevation of spermidine and spermine levels and the augmentation of S-denosyl-methionine decarboxylase activity in squash by temperature preconditioning was also correlated with increased resistance of the squash to chilling injury.

Free access

Treatment of mango (Mangifera indica cv Kent) with methyl jasmonate (MJ) vapor for 20 h at 20 °C was effective in reducing chilling injury (CI) symptoms and decay, and enhancing skin color development. MJ (10-4 M) was the most effective concentration for reducing CI and decay in fruit stored at 5 °C followed by 7 days at 20 °C (shelf life period). The use of 10-5 M MJ enhanced yellow and red color development of mango kept at 20 °C. These fruit possessed higher L*, a* and b* values than controls and those treated with 10-4 M MJ. Ripening processes were inhibited by cold storage in control fruits. After cold storage (5 °C) and the shelf life period, fruit treated with 10-5 M MJ fruit ripened normally and contained the highest total soluble solids (TSS). These fruit maintained higher sugar and organic acid levels than those in other treatments. We concluded that MJ treatment could be used to reduce decay and CI symptoms, and also to improve color development of mango fruit without adversely affecting quality.

Free access

Abstract

A 5-minute dip in a suspension of camptothecin, a naturally occurring growth regulator, at 5×10–2 mM or at higher concentrations inhibited both adventitious root growth and top sprouting of partially trimmed (tops trimmed to 5 mm) radishes (Raphanus sativus L., cvs. Comet and Stop Light) during 2 weeks of storage at 10° or 20°C. The treatment also reduced weight loss but did not affect changes in red color or ascorbic acid content. Camptothecin was ineffective in inhibiting sprouting when tops were trimmed to 25 mm. Radishes stored at 0° had no new root or top growth and thus showed no effect of the camptothecin treatment.

Open Access

Isozymes have been widely used as markers in cultivar identification, gene mapping and evolutionary studies. However, isozyme data have not been reported in elm species. This work was to develop an optimal system to analyze isozyme variations in American elm and Siberian elm. Two isolation methods were used to extract proteins from young leaf tissues and protein samples were separated by starch gel electrophoresis with three buffer systems. Eight isozymes have been detected in American elm (Ulmus americana) and Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila). Six out of these isozymes (DIA, GOT, MED, ALP, MNR, ACP) showed difference between the two elm species. These results suggest that isozymes can be used as markers in genetic studies in elms.

Free access

Abstract

An isolate of camptothecin alkaloids was applied to the eyes or sprouts on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) as lanolin suspensions at concentrations of 1.5, 3, 9, and 15 mM, or to the whole tubers as aqueous sprays or dips at various concentrations. Potato sprouting at 15°C was completely inhibited for 4 weeks by all the lanoline suspensions. Inhibition was greater than 95% when a solution of the alkaloids at 5 × 10−1 mM was applied to the tubers as a 3-spray or 3-dip treatment. The camptothecin treatments that inhibited sprouting also reduced weight loss of potato tubers; and even after 4 months at 15°, no symptoms of internal sprouting or other deleterious effects were evident. Electron micrographs of sprouts suggest that camptothecin inhibited sprouting by inducing structural changes in vascular tissues and interfering with cell division in the meristematic portions of the sprouts.

Open Access