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  • Author or Editor: C. F. Pierson x
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Abstract

Anjou scald, a physiological disease, produces a brown discoloration of the skin of Anjou pears after several months in cold storage. Only small amounts of the disease may be evident when the fruit is removed from the cold, but large amounts may develop within a few days at room temperature. Although the fruit is not seriously damaged by the disease, the discolored skin detracts from its appearence, and reduces its value in the market. Like storage scald of apples, the incidence of this disease can be reduced with oiled paper wraps (8). The use of polyethylene box liners prolongs the storage life of Anjou pears (4), but increases the tendency of the fruit to scald even in oiled wraps. Similarities in the responses of apples and pears to oiled paper suggested that the antioxidants used to control scald of apples might also be useful in the control of Anjou scald.

Open Access

Abstract

Alfalfa greening, (green stain, green mottle, or superficial cork) is a physiological disorder of ‘Anjou’ pear fruit, Pyrus communis L. This disorder is characterized by green streaks, blotches, and specks on the skin occurring most frequently at the stem end; it may also extend to the calyx end where superficial cork is also frequently present. Mineral analysis of the peel and whole fruit of alfalfa greening-affected fruit indicated that the disorder was associated with higher nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus content but lower calcium levels than normal fruit.

Open Access