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C. A. Conover

Results of a preliminary experiment using paclobutrazol at 0, 12 or 24 mg a.i./3.6-liter pot indicated that its use could enhance the appearance of pothos, but that some refinement of paclobutrazol rates should be made. Two experiments were conducted to determine the rate of paclobutrazol necessary to increase leaf size and optimize plant quality of pothos on totems in 3.6-liter pots grown under shadecloth providing 50% light penetration. In Experiment 1, rooted pothos cuttings were transplanted around a totem pole in a 3.6-liter pot and each pot was treated with a 250-ml drench of water containing Bonzi™ at 0, 4, 8, 12 or 16 mg a.i. Four mg a.i. of paclobutrazol yielded the most desirable plants, based on average leaf size, vine length and plant grade. Experiment 2 was designed to further refine the paclobutrazol application rate. Rooted cuttings of pothos were transplanted around a totem pole in a 3.6-liter pot and each pot was treated with a 100-ml drench of water containing paclobutrazol at 0, 1.32, 2.64, 3.96, 5.28, 6.60 or 7.92 mg a.i. Paclobutrazol applied at a rate of 5.28 mg a.i./3.6-liter pot optimized plant appearance by increasing leaf size and plant grade.

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C. A. Conover and R. T. Poole

Leaching of N into ground water has become a major pollutant in several areas of the U.S. The potential for regulation of environmental plant producers is increasing, but limited information is available on cultural management. This factorial experiment tested a liquid and a slow release fertilizer source at 3 irrigation levels (100, 200 or 300 ml/20 cm pot/2 times/wk) for NH4 +, NO3 - and P found in leachate collected weekly for 12 weeks. Plant quality and fresh weight for all treatments was similar, but large variations occurred in NH4 +, NO3 - and P levels in leachate due to irrigation level. Increasing irrigation level from 100 to 300 ml twice weekly resulted mainly in linear increases of NO3 - present in leachate, with levels as high as 159 mg/l observed near the end of the production cycle. NH4 + levels were most affected by irrigation and highest early in the experiment, but were generally lower than 1 mg/l. P levels ranged from 1.4 to 16.0 mg/l in leachate with responses to fertilizer source and irrigation mainly during the first 6 weeks.

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C. A. Conover and H. M. Vines

Abstract

Chlormequat (Cycocel, CCC) sprays and drench reduced plant height of poinsettias. Sprays of 5000 ppm were most effective with 25% reduction after 32 days followed by 3000 ppm - 18%, 1000 ppm - 17%, and 5000 ppm drench 12%. Appearance as indicated by chlorophyll analyses and chlorosis ratings was most seriously affected by sprays of 5000 ppm followed by 3000 ppm. The spray application of 1000 ppm and drench of 5000 ppm showed no deleterious effect to appearance. High fertilizer rates stimulated chlorophyll regeneration following spray applications of chlormequat partially overcoming the induced chlorosis. Nitrogen and K in leaf tissue increased in all treatments as fertilizer of that mixture was increased but P decreased.

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C. A. Conover and H. M. Vines

Abstract

Chlorotic foliage of Euphorbia pulcherrima did not contain substantially higher levels of free amino acids than normal non-chlormequat treated foliage, and in some cases levels were lower indicating inhibition rather than protein degradation.

Free amino acids detected and measured in µ/g fresh wt included glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glutamine, lysine, arginine, histidine, cystine, proline and phenylalanine.

The high fertilizer rates stimulated chlorophyll regeneration after damage from phytotoxic spray application of chlormequat and was closely correlated with amino acids im portant in N metabolism.

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C. A. Conover and R. T. Poole

Abstract

Appearance of container grown Fiscus benjamina Linn. (weeping fig) and Brassaia actinophylla Pov. (schefflera), as measured by plant grade, density and leaf retention after 10 weeks under an interior environment, was improved over plants grown in full sun when plants were previously acclimatized under 40 or 80% shade for 5 or more weeks. There was also an increase in leaf retention as interior light supplied 12 hours/day 7 days a week, increased from 270 to 810 to 1350 lumens/m2.

Open access

J. N. Joiner and C. A. Conover

Abstract

Compared with manual pruning, use of fatty acid pruning compounds (Emgard, Off-Shoot-O and C-10) increased time to bloom for Rhodedendron obtusum Planch ‘Alaska’ and ‘Red Wing’ and decreased flower number on ‘Alaska’. Pruning compounds interacted with succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH) and (2-chloroethyl)triethylammonium chloride (chlormequat) as well as frequency of application in affecting date of bloom and number of flowers.

Open access

C. A. Conover and R. T. Poole

Abstract

Experiments conducted on Caladium bicolor Vent cv. Candidum have shown that apical bud removal increased number of shoots and decreased leaf length, height and color. Planting tubers inverted decreased grade, leaf length, height, and color. Increasing fertilizer level from 0 to 3.0 or 6.0 kg Osmocote/m3 had no influence on leaf size, but influenced grade, number of shoots, and leaf color. Interaction between fertilizer level and tuber orientation indicated higher nutrient levels were partly able to overcome deleterious effects of inverted placement, while interaction between apical bud removal and tuber orientation demonstrated negative effects of bud removal when combined with tuber inversion.

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C. A. Conover and R. T. Poole

Abstract

Grade and vine length of P. oxycardium growing on totem poles increased as shade level decreased from 80 to 40%. Highest grade was obtained with Osmocote, followed by liquid fertilizer and MagAmp. Generally, 785 kg N/ha/3 months was adequate for good growth, although interactions occurred with light intensity as shown by lack of fertilizer response at high shade levels. Foliar N levels were higher in 80% shade but quality decreased. MagAmp increased P and Mg and decreased Ca and K levels in foliage, while Osmocote increased N.

Open access

C.A. Conover and R.T. Poole

Abstract

Six potting media (Metro Mix 200, 300, 350, 500, 2 sedge peatmoss : 1 pine bark : 1 cypress shavings (by volume) and 3 sedge peatmoss : 1 mason sand (v/v) were compacted at 0, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 kg·cm−2. Noncapillary pore space was reduced in all media at 0.1 kg·cm−2 as compared to 0 pressure, but increasing compaction pressure had more effect on 2:1:1 than on 3:1 or Metro Mixes. Pilea pubescens Liebm. ‘Silver Tree’ and Dracaena sanderana Hort. Sander ex M. T. Mast. were used in two additional experiments where the six media were combined factorially with compaction pressures of 0.1 and 0.2 kg·cm−2 and irrigation rates of two or four applications/week. Both genera were affected more by potting media and irrigation levels than by compaction, with best plants generally produced in Metro Mixes receiving the higher irrigation level.

Open access

C. A. Conover and R. T. Poole

Abstract

Physical characteristics were determined for 5 potting media composed of varying ratios of Florida sedge peat and pine bark subjected to compaction pressures of 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 kg/cm2. Percent noncapillary pore space decreased as compaction pressure and amount of peat in the mixture increased, while water holding capacity by volume increased with peat addition and compaction pressure. Top growth of Pilea pubescens ‘Silver Tree’ in compacted media was generally as good as in noncompacted media, but root growth was restricted.