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  • Author or Editor: Bruno C. Moser x
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Information on the Internet relative to the landscape and nursery industries is rapidly expanding. However, finding reliable sites on subjects of interest to the field of commercial landscape horticulture is a difficult task. PLANT: Purdue Landscape and Nursery Thesaurus, is an extensive database of links to Internet information for professional landscape contractors/managers and nursery growers in Midwest and Northeast states. PLANT currently consists of 21 independent pages on topics from “Computer Software” to “Winter Hardiness”, with >2500 links to appropriate Internet information. A search mode allows one to search the database by key words as well. This extension-based tool is also an excellent resource for class assignments in the area of ornamentals and landscape horticulture. As a work in process, PLANT is regularly updated and expanded to provide multiple sources if Internet information on topics of interest to the landscape and nursery industries. PLANT can be found at bluestem.hort.purdue.edu/plant/.

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Employers of undergraduates tell us there is a need to turn out students with greater communication and teamwork skills in addition to good horticultural and business training. Field trips are an important tool to expose students to the real world of horticulture. The course “Nursery Crop Production” has adopted a class project that enhances these skills and experiences. Teams of three students each are assigned a production nursery to visit and to bring back documentation to the class in the form of an edited video tape and a written report containing pictures. Their report is presented in class and each student receives a composite video tape and written report of all team efforts. Quality of the reports has been remarkable. Each part of the project (video, written report, and class presentation) is graded independently, with all team members receiving the same final grade. The department has purchased video cameras and editing equipment, which are essential to the success of this educational experience. Student evaluations indicate enthusiasm for this approach and the role of video in the class. Copies of finished projects are returned to each nursery for their information. A collection of these projects is being assembled to provide the Nursery and Landscape Crops Extension Specialist with additional information about the production nursery industry.

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Abstract

Three- to 4-cm caliper pin oak (Quercus palustris Muenchh.), a species considered easy to transplant, had greater total root length and more first, 2nd, and 3rd order lateral roots than similar sized scarlet oak (Q. coccinea Juench.), a species considered difficult to transplant. One-year-old seedlings initiated roots 2 weeks earlier in spring and regenerated more roots after 12 weeks than did scarlet oak. Girdled, dormant scarlet oak seedlings regenerated similar numbers of roots as ungirdled plants, while girdled, dormant pin oak seedlings regenerated fewer roots. Removing buds from dormant seedlings decreased root regeneration by pin oak, but had no effect with scarlet oak.

Open Access

Royal Horticulture Society Colour Chart cards were used to compare the Linotype-Hell Saphir color flatbed scanner, the Minolta CR-200 chromameter and the HunterLab Labscan XE colorimeter in the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* three-dimensional color space. Regression analysis revealed that these instruments measure color in a similar manner with most R 2 values greater than 0.97 and slopes near unity for comparison of each of the three color space parameters (L*, a*, b*). Standard errors were also found to be within a narrow range for each parameter, L* (2.19 to 3.97), a* (5.97 to 12.01), b* (4.10 to 6.71). The Linotype-Hell Saphir color flatbed scanner and the Minolta CR-200 chromameter were also compared for samples with surface curvature using redtwig dogwood (Cornus serecia 'Baileyi') and yellowtwig dogwood (Cornus serecia `Flaviramea') stems but no significant difference was found.

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Field experiments were conducted to investigate the potential of using pussy willow (Salix discolor) as part of filter strip plantings to control soil erosion and chemical runoff from agronomic crops into nearby waterways. Of special interest was the possibility of obtaining economic return from the filter strip planting in the off-season for agronomic farmers.

Pussy willow cuttings were planted six feet apart in three rows between agronomic cropland and a waterway with ten feet between the rows in spring 1990. Branches were first harvested in February 1992 and again in February 1993. Harvest techniques included removal of all branches at 10 inches or 24 inches above ground level.

The 1992 harvest yielded 72 salable branches per plant which were graded into four sizes. The total weight and number of branches decreased with increasing row distance from the cropland. The 1993 harvest yielded larger, more uniform branches. Comparisons of yields from multiple year harvesting techniques will be presented and economic possibilities discussed.

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Abstract

Leaf cuttings of ‘Schwabenland Red’ Rieger begonia (Begonia × hiemalis Fotsch) regenerated buds prolifically, whereas ‘Aphrodite Pink’ regenerated buds sparingly, with fewer buds per cutting. Bud initiation was maximal in winter in both cultivars. Shoot development was maximal in ‘Schwabenland Red’ in spring and fall, and was maximal in ‘Aphrodite Pink’ in winter. Lack of bud initiation inhibited shoot development in ‘Aphrodite Pink’ but not in ‘Schwabenland Red’. Seasonal variation was eliminated, and shoot development was maximized in ‘Schwabenland Red’ when mother plants were grown on a short day and cuttings on a long day cycle. This daylength procedure did not eliminate seasonal variation in ‘Aphrodite Pink’, although it maximized shoot development over the year. Factors other than photoperiod may have played a role in ‘Aphrodite Pink’.

Open Access

Abstract

Short days on the mother plant and long days on leaf cutting resulted in the most rapid shoot initiation in Rieger begonia (Begonia × hiemalis Fotsch cvs. Schwabenland Red and Aphrodite Pink). High temperatures on the mother plants nullified the beneficial effect of this photoperiodic treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

Gibberellic acid (GA3) applied to Hedera helix L. cv. Baltica markedly enhanced branching; optimum treatment was 300 ppm applied twice on alternate weeks. The branching effect was evident only on growth occurring from buds maturing after treatment. When GA3 was applied to pruned plants secondary lateral shoot growth occurred. Application of 6-benzylamino-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)-9H-purine (PBA) did not affect lateral growth.

Open Access

Abstract

Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Contender (green bean) treated with sea salt aerosols, similar to ambient seashore conditions displayed foliar injury from exposures of 8, 168, and 480 hr at sedimentation rates of 27, 5.7 and 1.5 μg/m2/sec, respectively. Sodium and chloride uptake was linear with time. Toxicity symptoms corresponded with a critical leaf tissue level of 2.6% Cl regardless of exposure time or sedimentation rate.

Open Access