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  • Author or Editor: Bruce Bostian x
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Effects of herbicides and weeds were demonstrated by exposing `Excel' sweetpotatoes to a randomized complete block design of 3 replications of various treatments ranging from phytotoxity to no weed control in 1991 & 1992. Plots were either left unweeded, hoed clean or treated with herbicides (sethoxydim, clomazone, metolachlor, imazethapyr) or selective hand weeded to remove broadleaf weeds. Hand weeded treatments were hoed twice. After 120 days weeds remaining in each plot were cut at ground level, dried and weighed. At 125 days the plots were harvested. The roots were cured, graded and weighed. Weed dry weight ranged from zero to nearly 6.5 cwt/A. Weed dry weight as a % of total marketable sweetpotatoes ranged from zero to 34.5% in 1991 and zero to 19.8% in 1992. Competition from grasses reduced sweetpotato yield more than broadleaf weeds. Total marketable sweetpotato yields ranged from zero to 426 cwt/A in 1991 and from 210 cwt/A to 289 cwt/A in 1992.

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Root yield and quality were evaluated in 15 carrot (Daucus carota) cultivars for use in processing. Marketable yield varied between the fall and spring production seasons for seven of the 15 cultivars with the highest yields recorded in the fall. ‘C 8771’ and ‘Heritage’ had the highest yields in Fall 2003. ‘Bremen’ and ‘Neptune’ were the highest yielding in Spring 2004. Root length was longest in the fall for a majority of cultivars with ‘PS 103397’ being the longest in the fall and ‘Pipeline’ longest in the spring. Forking of roots did not vary significantly for either season. Field color ratings were taken to indicate color differences between the interior core and cortex of the roots. ‘Florida’, ‘Heritage’, ‘Kamaran’, and ‘C 8771’ had consistently less difference between the core and cortex colors. Based on consistent yield and color uniformity, the authors would recommend the use of ‘C 8771’ and ‘Kamaran’ for both spring and fall production seasons in Oklahoma and the use of ‘Heritage’ and ‘Florida’ for fall production.

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Dalmation sage was transplanted in rows 92 cm apart with in-row spacing of 30 cm on 12 April 1989 at the Vegetable Research Station, Bixby, Oklahoma. Plots one row by 55 m long were established to determine the best timing for harvest and to observe the effect of cutting height and date on yield and regrowth in the fall and regrowth the following season.

Four harvest dates in 1989 were 15 August, 25 August, 18 September and 8 November. In addition, one half of the plots harvested 15 August were recut on 5 November. Cutting height was 10 cm on 15 August, 12 cm on 25 August and 15 cm at all other harvest dates in 1989 and 1990. Four harvests were made on all plots during the 1990 season except those cut or recut in November 1989. Spring 1990 regrowth was very poor and no harvest was possible in April 1990 on November 1989 harvested plots. Highest total dry weight yields for the 1989 and 1990 seasons were produced by the 15 August initial cut with a 5 November recut (11,522 kg·ha-1) and the 8 November 1989 cut plots (10,881 kg·ha-1). Other plots that were harvested once in August or September 1989 plus four separate harvests in 1990 produced a total yield near 9,500 kg·ha-1. The 15 cm height of cut appeared to be superior to cutting closer to the soil.

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The objectives of this trial were to collect yield and quality data on a fall planted carrot trial. Fifteen different carrot varieties were included in the trial. Plots were 20 feet by 2.5 feet and consisted of two rows of carrots with 15-inch row centers. Plots were replicated 4 times in a RBD. Carrots were direct seeded on 8 Aug. 2003 at 20 seeds per foot. Plots were fertilized with 90 lbs/acre of nitrogen and received overhead water as needed. Yield and quality data were recorded on 5 Dec. 2003. Data included exterior root color, interior root color, percentage of split and forked roots, overall yield, average root length and weight. Exterior root color did not vary significantly for any of the cultivars in the trial, but interior root color varied significantly for several cultivars. `First Class', `Bolero', and `C 7105' had the most distinct differences between the pith and out ring colors as indicated by the interior root color ratings and `Ingot' had the lowest. Interior root color ratings for these four cultivars were 3.8, 3.6, 3.1, and 1.4, respectively. Crispness did not vary for either the initial or second ratings that were recorded. Of potential defects only the percentage of forked roots varied significantly and of these four cultivars had less than 10% forked roots. `Florida', `Kamaran', `Pipeline', and `C 7105' had 5%, 7%, 9%, and 9% forked roots, respectively. `Samantha' had 31% forked roots, the highest percentage recorded in the trial. No differences were recorded for root weight, diameter or length. The three highest yielding cultivars in the trial were `Ingot', `Heritage', and `Neptune' that had overall yields of 24.9, 20.6, and 20.6 tons/acre. `Bremen' recorded the lowest yield in the trial with 13.7 tons/acre.

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