Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Bob Bors x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Bob Bors and J. Alan Sullivan

Previous research has optimized the colchicine dropper technique for chromosome doubling under greenhouse conditions. In recent years, in vitro germination of cut strawberry achenes has greatly increased germination rates. Combining the two techniques would be especially useful when chromosome doubling is desired for interspecific hybridization. Fragaria vesca was chosen for initial study. Treatments included colchicine levels of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, or 5% (w/v); exposure time to colchicine was from 6 to 16 to 26 hours; application was at the cotyledon stage or after the first true leaf formed; presence or absence of 3 g activated charcoal/liter; and presence or absence of DMSO. Media consisted of MS salts and vitamins, 30 g sucrose/liter, and 2.5 g phytogel/liter. Charcoal enhanced upward growth of seedlings, thus allowing better placement of colchicine droplets. Reduced exposure time and application at the first true-leaf stage allowed higher levels of colchicine to be used without greatly reducing the vigor of treated seedlings.

Free access

Bob Bors and J. Alan Sullivan

Fragaria vesca has been introgressed into F. ×ananassa in the form of decaploids and synthetic octoploids. As F. vesca is self-incompatible and crosses with most diploid Fragaria species when used as a female parent, it could serve as a bridge for introgression of additional genetic material. A primary goal of this study was to screen selections of F. vesca for interspecific crossability among diploid species. The F. vesca collection included 10 cultivars of the alpine strawberry, F. vesca var. semperflorens, as well as 30 wild runnering types gathered from around the world. The following diploid species were represented by one to three genotypes each: F. viridis, F. nubicola, F. nipponica, F. nilgerens, F. iinumae, F. daltoniana, F. gracilis, as well as two unnamed species from China. Fragaria vesca was used as the female parent and the other species provided the pollen. Crossing took place in the greenhouse, with one pollination occurring during the “popcorn” or “balloon” stage. Germination was performed in vitro using cut achenes shortly after fruit ripening. The alpine strawberry cultivars were easier to cross than wild selections of F. vesca. Their continuous blooming habit combined with higher positioning of flowers allowed for easier and perhaps less-damaging emasculation. Crossability, as measured by seed set and germination, was more variable in wild-type F. vesca and generally lower than alpine strawberry cultivars.

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Martine Deschênes, Audrey Levasseur, Odile Carisse, Marie Thérèse Charles, Djamila Rekika, Rong Tsao, Raymond Yang, Jennifer DeEll, Patrice Thibeault, Jean-Pierre Privé, Campbell Davidson and Bob Bors