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  • Author or Editor: Bo Wu x
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Loropetalum chinense, one of three species in its genus in China, is distributed primarily in Hunan and Jiangxi Provinces. By establishing a Loropetalum gene bank and reviewing research on its varieties, genetic traits, and genetic diversity, we hope to promote the full yet sustainable use of this valuable, regionally varied natural resource. Our results will help promote the development of a broader resource economy.

Open Access

Muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia) is highly resistant to many diseases and insects that attack european grape (Vitis vinifera). However, distant hybridization incompatibility between V. rotundifolia (female) and V. vinifera (male) impedes the utilization of V. rotundifolia in grape breeding. This study used fourth-dimension label-free protein quantitation to detect the key genes and pathways in the V. rotundifolia stigma after self-pollination (V. rotundifolia × V. rotundifolia) and cross-pollination (V. rotundifolia × V. vinifera). A histological analysis showed that pollen tube growth in the stigma of V. rotundifolia was arrested 8 hours after cross-pollination, but not after self-pollination. A proteomic analysis identified 32 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the stigma of V. rotundifolia between self-pollination and cross-pollination. A heatmap analysis grouped these DEPs into four clusters. The top gene ontology terms were ATPase-coupled transmembrane transporter activity, extracellular region, DNA replication, and cellular carbohydrate biosynthetic process. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that these DEPs participated in DNA replication and starch and sucrose metabolism pathways. The downregulated A5AY88, D7TJ35, D7SU26, F6HJI1, and F6GUE7 may have a role in cross incompatibility. This study revealed the cross incompatibility of grapes at histological and proteomic levels.

Open Access

Lettuce drop caused by Sclerotinia spp. is an economically important disease of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), and cultivars with resistance to mycelial infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary and S. minor Jagger as well as to S. sclerotiorum ascospores are needed. Assessing resistance in field experiments can be complicated by fast bolting or small stature lettuce lines that may escape rather than resist the pathogens. Therefore, methods to select resistant lines from morphologically variable populations are needed. We used S. sclerotiorum and S. minor-infested field experiments, regression analysis, field experiments with artificially high plant densities, and S. sclerotiorum ascospore inoculations to identify lettuce lines with resistance to both pathogens. Three replicated experiments in S. sclerotiorum-infested fields were conducted in Yuma, AZ, and three replicated experiments in a S. minor-infested field were conducted in Salinas, CA, using diverse populations of iceberg, romaine, leaf, butterhead, Latin, oilseed lettuce, and wild relatives of lettuces; and genetic variation for the incidence of lettuce drop from mycelial infections was identified. In two S. minor field experiments, a quadratic regression model was developed that related rapid bolting with reduced lettuce drop. Regression residuals were calculated, and eight cultivars or PIs had negative residuals in two independent field experiments, indicating higher resistance than predicted by their rate of bolting. Eruption, a small-statured Latin cultivar, had significantly lower disease levels than susceptible cultivars in experiments with high plant densities, indicating that its small size did not facilitate disease escape. Ascospore inoculations confirmed resistance in ‘Eruption’ and L. virosa SAL012, whereas the oilseed lettuce PI 251246 may have partial resistance to infection. These lines will likely be useful for development of Sclerotinia spp.-resistant lettuce cultivars.

Free access

Exogenous application of either salicylic acid (SA) or calcium chloride (CaCl2) to alleviate heat stress has been extensively studied. However, the effects of combined SA and CaCl2 treatment on the heat tolerance of poinsettia have been poorly studied. This study investigated the role of a foliar spray comprising SA and CaCl2 in managing heat tolerance of three poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd.) cultivars, Noel, Winter Rose (WR), and Ice Punch’ (IP). Plants were pretreated with SA, CaCl2, or combined SA and CaCl2 and then exposed to a temperature of 42 °C for 1 hour. Changes in the relative injury (RI) percentage, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and antioxidant enzyme activities were determined. All plants were then placed in an environment-controlled greenhouse for 14 days and evaluated. Lateral bud sprouting (%), new leaf numbers, and phenotypic appearance were recorded. Results revealed that the three poinsettia cultivars varied in their appearance, morphological growth patterns, and ability to tolerate high-temperature stress. Plant growth of ‘Noel’ was more robust than that of ‘WR’ and ‘IP’, which were considerably affected by heat stress, resulting in brown, withered leaves and defoliation. In general, the effects of the combined application of SA and CaCl2 on heat-tolerant ‘Noel’ were superior to those of individual applications and no treatment (for control groups) in terms of the RI percentage, lateral bud sprouting (%), and appearance under heat stress. Application of combined SA and CaCl2 for ‘Noel’ plants was more beneficial for enhancing catalase activity and resulted in the effective alleviation of decreased malondialdehyde content under heat stress. Treatment including 200 μΜ SA and 10 mm CaCl2 may alleviate heat stress and may prove useful in breeding programs focused on improving poinsettia cultivars.

Free access

In natural conditions, it takes more than 3 years to complete the Ananas juvenile phase, and another 2 years for adult vegetative growth of the plantlet from in vitro buds. Ethylene has often been used to shorten the juvenile and vegetative phases to produce earlier flowering. It is important to induce in vitro flowering of Ananas plants to understand the flowering mechanism more completely, which is also related to flower organ differentiation and development as well as the pineapple fruit eye development. In this study, Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium was used to select the best combination for adventitious bud induction from the callus of Ananas bracteatus var. tricolor (A. tricolor). Flower induction from the callus was studied using 6-benzyladenine (6-BA) and 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA) at four different concentrations (0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mg⋅L–1). Our results showed that when MS was added with 3 mg⋅L–1 6-BA and 2 mg⋅L–1 NAA under 2000 μmol⋅m–2⋅s–1 of light for 16 hours per day at a temperature of 20 °C, the callus of A. tricolor grew quickly, and adventitious buds were induced. After more than four successive subcultures (at day 80), differentiation of flower buds was observed on the aging callus tissue before a complete floral organ developed. This research could be used for the flowering regulation of Ananas plants in the future. Inducing flowers directly from the callus has important scientific significance for the differentiation and morphogenesis of Ananas plants.

Open Access