Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Bernard A. Kratky x
Clear All Modify Search

A simple, capillary, non-circulating hydroponic method is described. Lettuce seedlings are transplanted into 218-mm-long plastic tubes containing 160 ml of growing medium and the bottom 25 mm is submerged into a tank of nutrient solution. No additional fertilization, watering, or monitoring is required from transplanting until harvesting. Although the nutrient solution level may drop below the bottoms of the tubes, the roots continue to take up adequate water and nutrients to sustain growth. This method does not require pumps or electrical power. `Green Ice' leaf lettuce produced 24% more salable yield growing with this method than comparable plants growing in conventional soil culture.

Full access

Abstract

Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were grown in a noncirculating hydroponic system and also in conventional soil beds. Yields from the two cultural systems were statistically similar, i.e., 3.5 kg/plant in the hydroponic system and 3.1 kg/plant in the soils beds.

Open Access

Abstract

Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) juvenile population increased and carrot (Daucus carota L.) yield progressively decreased during eight continuous carrot crops grown over 37 months. When ‘Haifa’ and common white clovers (Trifolium repens L.) were cropped for 29 months and plowed down, two succeeding carrot crops suffered severe yield and quality losses and the juvenile nematode population in the soil in-creased greatly. However, there were significantly fewer juveniles in the soil and significantly higher yield and better quality of carrots when nematode-resistant ‘Nevada Synthetic XX’ and ‘Nevada Synthetic YY alfalfas (Medicago sativa L.) and continuous cultivation preceeded the carrots.

Open Access