Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Benjamin Mullinix x
Clear All Modify Search

Eleven `Desirable' pecan trees with yield data for 22 to 47 years were selected from a database with data from three orchards. Cumulative yield were computed for each tree. Cumulative data was transformed using LOG10. Quadratic or cubic regression curves were fit for each tree and for all in a single analysis. In most cases, variances were not homogeneous among the 11 trees. Using the regression coefficients for each tree, an average of the five was made and appropriate standard errors were computed. Number of cases where homogeneity of variances were found increased. Younger trees benefiting from better orchard management had different variances than older trees moving across changing managements. LOG10-transformation tended to decrease variation, but variances were still heterogeneous.

Free access

Five `Poinsett' cucumbers were selected at random for each treatment in a postharvest storage experiment. Each cucumber was weighed initially, covered by wax “E”, and weighed each day afterwards for 9 days. Percentage loss was computed for each day. Quadratic regression curves were fit for each cucumber and for all in a single analysis. In most cases, variances were not homogeneous among the five cucumbers. Using the regression coefficients for each cucumber, an average of the five was made and appropriate standard errors were computed. Percent loss data was transformed using SQRT. The number of cases where homogeneity of variances were found increased. Mixture of large and small cucumbers by weight tended not to be homogeneous, whereas mixing of cucumbers of similar weights were improved with square-root transformation.

Free access

Yield and quality of pecan nuts were as high when 50 pounds N/acre was applied through a dripirrigation system as with 100 pounds/acre (112 kg·ha−1) applied either all broadcast or half broadcast-half fertigated. All N treatments kept leaf N well above the 2.50% (dry weight) lower threshold recommended for pecans. The 50 pounds N/acre-all-fertigated treatment resulted in less soil pH reduction and less loss of K, Ca, and Mg from soil in the nonwetted zone underneath the tree canopy than broadcast treatments. Soil pH, K, and Mg were slightly lowered in the 6- to 12-inch (15 to 30 cm) soil layer when all of the N was fertigated. Higher leaf Ca and Mg from the low rate of N fertigated reflected the higher concentrations of these elements in the soil in the nonwetted zone rather than the lower concentrations in the wetted zone. There was no evidence of a detrimental effect on the tree from lowering the N application to only 50 pounds/acre and applying it in four monthly applications through the drip irrigation system beginning 1 Apr.

Full access

Three out of many pecan cultivars (Gloria, Pabst, & Stuart) were examined over long periods of time. The latter two cultivars have been planted since 1921 when the first pecan orchard was established. One tree of each of these cultivars were removed because of overcrowding. Gloria and Pabst were planted in 1954. Best production practices known were used until 1962. Fertilization and insecticide sprays were adopted. In 1970, spraying for disease was adopted. In 1974, drip irrigation and selective limb pruning were adopted. GrowSeason (GS) [(Year-Planted+l)-mean GS] was used in a linear (L), quadratic (Q), or cubic (C) model where the best model was chosen (significant F-test). Yield was expressed as cumulative yield. Older trees tended to produce more after 1962 (C trend), mid-aged trees more after 1970 (Q/C trend), and younger trees more after 1974 (L/Q trend). Younger trees had the greatest average yearly cumulative yield.

Free access

'Climax' and 'Tifblue' blueberry cultivars were harvested, cooled, and later warmed to room temperature for use in individual berry dropping experiments. Surfaces used were concrete, “Softer NoBruze” and “Poron #7R70-Grey.” Berries in the check were not dropped. Three groups of 25 berries were dropped individually from various heights ranging from .5 ft to 7 ft. Initially, berries were cut to determine percent flesh showing bruising. Later, berries were rolled between fingers and assigned a firmness: firm, medium firm, or soft. The first two firmnesses are considered marketable. Fruit tended to bruise more when harvested later in season. More bruising occurred with higher drop heights. More marketable fruit resulted from thicker padding. Repeated dropping increased bruising. “NoBruze” was superior to “Poron” at any thickness. Many berries in the mechanical harvester have to drop over a foot onto a metal surface; padding these surfaces should increase percent of marketable (undamaged) berry yield.

Free access

Vidalia onions were grown following recommended cultural practices in 1994-1996 and they were harvested at early, optimum, or late maturity. After onions were cured for various lengths of time, a random sample of onions was marked for individual measurement. All onions were placed into either low or high humidity A/C controlled storage for up to 30 weeks. Onions were removed as they showed signs of being rotten. Initially, and every 2 weeks thereafter, weight and grade data were collected from individual onions and in bulk from other onions. There were up to 96 treatment combinations each year. Using individual onion data, simulation of the weight loss of the bulked onions was done. Although over 5,000 onions were involved, individual measurements were taken on only 1,920 onions over the 3 years. Five simulations were conducted using parameters derived from individual onion data. Results of the simulations resembled the actual weight loss trends within the specified 90% confidence range.

Free access

The Tri-State Cooperative Project involved North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Muskmelons were grown following recommended cultural practices at seven locations in 1985-1987. Two plantings in the spring and again in the fall were made. Cultivars were HILINE, MAGNUM, MAINST, and SUMMET. Locations were for North Carolina: Fletcher (FLT) and Lewiston (LEW); for South Carolina: Clemson (CLM), Charleston (CHL), and Florence (PD); and for Georgia: Attapulgus (ATT) and Plains-Tifton (PLA). Not all locations planted muskmelons during the 12 planting times available except the two spring plantings in 1987. Analysis of each location revealed that years were significant except for ATT; seasons except for ATT; plantings except for FLT; and cultivars except for CHL and LEW. Season × cultivar was significant only for FLT and PLA. LEW and ATT had the highest yields, while FLT had the highest variance. Spring plantings had higher yields. MAINST had the highest yield among the cultivars. Analysis of the location by cultivar means revealed that locations were significant (P = 0.01) and cultivars were significant (P = 0.05).

Free access

Onions were harvested early, optimum, late (0%, 7%, 100% tops down). Onions were placed at random into one of twenty-four 30 × 30 × 30-cm boxes, which were stacked four high. Heated air was forced from bottom to top of each stack (curing). Curing lasted 24, 48, or 72 hours. Onions from each box were graded as to size and placed at random into one of four mesh bags for storage. Two bags each were put into either low- or high-humidity conditions. One of two bags were used for the individual onion study. Initially and every 2 weeks for 30 weeks, each onion was weighed and resized for effects of moisture loss. Moisture loss was correlated with harvest maturity: early 25%; optimum 28%; late 31%. Moisture loss rates were similar regardless of grade size. Lasting 30 weeks by size: J 1%; L 13%; M 25%; S 40%. Size reduction: J–>L 10%; L–>M 18%; M–>S 25%. Individual onions' moisture loss rate were highly variable.

Free access

Onions were harvested early (0% tops down), optimum (7% tops down), or late (100% tops down) and placed at random into one of twenty-four 30 × 30 × 30-cm boxes. Four boxes were stacked, resulting in six stacks. Onions in a stack were cured 24, 48, or 72 hours by forcing heated air from bottom to top of stack. Cured onions at each depth were then graded as to size and randomly placed into one of four mesh bags for storage. Two bags were placed in low humidity, the other two in high humidity. A bag of onions were inspected for any visible rots, which were removed. Good and bad onions were weighed separately and counted by size. This was repeated every 2 weeks for 30 weeks. Ninety percent of all early harvested onions lasted 10 weeks, while 50% of small early harvested onions lasted 30 weeks. Smaller grades lasted longer. More hours of initial curing helped smaller than larger grades.

Free access

Abstract

The xylem water potential of leaves of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was lower for trees with moderate to high counts of the phony peach disease organism in roots during the day in September and October (P = 0.1%), after bloom in March (P = 3%), and before harvest in May (P = 1%). No significant differences occurred for predawn measurements on any date, during periods of rapid shoot growth in June, and for measurements made on terminal twigs in January. Experimental results suggest that the phony disease organism invades and clogs the new xylem each year. The internal water stress that results when the tree transpires produces the fruit and shoot symptoms known as phony disease of peach.

Open Access