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  • Author or Editor: B.C. Moser x
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A number of deciduous woody ornamental plants experience seasonal changes in stem pigmentation. The resulting coloration yields plants desirable for use as cut branches in the florist trade. The dynamics of color change are particularly important in identifying harvest periods based on optimum color. The characterization of this process has been investigated for Cornus (Cornus baileyi, Cornus sericea `Cardinal', Cornus sericea `Flaviramea', Cornus alba `Bud's Yellow') and Salix (Salix matsudana `Tortosa', Salix `Golden Curls', Salix `Scarlet Curls') cultivars. Seasonal color changes are presented in relation to date. These data were compared to chlorophyll and anthocyanin levels to further characterize pigmentation change. Because size and round stem shape are not conducive to traditional tristimulus color measurement techniques, L*a*b* measurements were obtained from images imported via computer scanner as CIELAB images. L*a*b* values then were used to determine hue angle and chromaticity for each sample date. Postharvest storage duration and conditions are evaluated with regard to moisture content and color retention in cut branches.

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Abstract

Root regeneration and shoot growth of seedlings of Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip tree) increased as temperature of either the soil or aerial growing environment increased from 10° to 21°C. Indolebutyric acid-potassium salt, (IBA), applied to the tap roots at 1000 mg liter−1, increased root regeneration and shoot growth when both air and soil temperatures were held at either 15.5° or 21°. When air temperature was maintained at 21° and soil temperature was varied from 10° to 21°, root regeneration and shoot growth increased as soil temperature increased. IBA increased root regeneration only when soil temperature was 21°.

Open Access

Abstract

Leaf cuttings of Rieger elatior begonias (Begonia bertini ‘compacti’ × B. socotrana cvs. Aphrodite Cherry Red and Schwabenland Red) were treated with 6-furfurylamino purine (kinetin), 6-benzylamino purine (BA), and 6-(benzylamino)-9-(2-tetrahydropyranyl)-9H-purine (PBA). BA and PBA enhanced bud and shoot regeneration in ‘Aphrodite Cherry Red,’ while kinetin showed no activity. All cytokinins tested reduced shoot development in ‘Schwabenland Red.’ PBA stimulated optimal bud and shoot development when applied to ‘Aphrodite Cherry Red’ leaf cuttings as a 12 hour 15 μM basal-petiole dip, 1000 μM spray, and 0.01% talc-petiole- dip. Cuttings taken from ‘Aphrodite Cherry Red’ stock plants treated with 1000 μM PBA successfully generated new plants.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Root regeneration of tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) was greater when seedlings were transplanted in the spring than in the fall. Indolebutyric acid–potassium salt (IBA) applied to the roots increased root regeneration with the greatest response at 1000 to 3000 mg liter−1 in the spring and 3000 mg liter−1 in the fall. Root regeneration and shoot growth increased as time of chilling at 2°C prior to transplanting increased from 0 to 1680 hours; 1008 hours satisfied the chilling requirement. Photoperiod did not directly influence root regeneration during either season. Root regeneration and shoot growth of shoot-pruned plants interacted with season, IBA treatment, and level of stem pruning. Decreasing sunlight intensity by 20%, 47%, or 74% reduced root regeneration and shoot growth. IBA improved root initiation over untreated plants at all light intensities tested, but subsequent growth of these roots decreased with decreased light.

Open Access