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  • Author or Editor: B. Tjia x
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Abstract

The recent availability of zantedeschia hybrids with large flowers of various colors has made zantedeschia a popular cut flower in New Zealand, Japan, and Europe. New Zealand zantedeschia breeders have developed hybrids that are free-suckering with multiple flowers, which makes them a potential potted plant. However, zantedeschia attain heights of 40 to 50 cm and are not aesthetically pleasing specimens grown in 15-cm containers without use of growth regulator chemicals.

Open Access
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Abstract

(2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) applied as a foliar spray on field-grown Hydrangea macrophylla 2 weeks prior to cold storage caused defoliation within 8 to 9 days. Complete defoliation occurred at 1000 to 5000 ppm of ethephon spray on both ‘Merveille’ and ‘Rose Supreme’. Ethephon-treated plants showed reduced height after subsequent forcing in the greenhouse. ‘Merveille’ was more sensitive to ethephon spray carry over than ‘Rose Supreme’. Optimum concentration range for defoliation and height reduction without any visible detrimental phytotoxic symptoms was 1000 and 2000 ppm for ‘Merveille’ and 1000 to 3000 ppm for ‘Rose Supreme’. Ethephon at 3000 ppm or higher on ‘Merveille’ and 5000 ppm or higher on ‘Rose Supreme’ induced abnormal yellow pigmentation of the flowers.

Open Access
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Abstract

Lisianthus russellianus Hook., syn. Eustoma grandiflorum, belongs to the Gentianacea and is native from the plains of Nebraska to Louisiana and Mexico. It is a tender annual, grows 45 cm high, and produces 5 lobed, purple, dark-eyed flowers in summer and fall. The flowers have been described as large as 10 cm across under favorable conditions and to number as many as 10 or more on a plant. Flowers have lasted up to 2 weeks.

Open Access

Abstract

Effectiveness of α-cyclopropyl α-(p-m ethoxyphenyl)-5 pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol) drench, (2-chloroethyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (chlormequat), drench or encapsulated, and (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon), drench or granular, were compared on Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. cvs. White Hegg and Dark Red Hegg. The most effective chemicals in terms of height control, improved foliage quality, size of bracts were 0.5 mg ancymidol (drench), 3000 ppm chlormequat (drench), 1250 ppm ethephon (drench) and 2.0 to 7.0 g ethephon (granulated).

Open Access

Abstract

The surfactant alkaryl polyoxyethylene glycol containing free fatty adds and isopropanol (X -77) destructs apical meristems on Chrysanthemums morifolium Ramat: and shows potential for chemical pruning at concentration of 3.5 to 4%.

Open Access
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Abstract

Foliar application of 5% and 10% alkaryl polyoxyethylene glycol (X–77) surfactant to greenhouse forced pre-cooled ‘Georgia’ Easter lilies resulted in flower bud abortion and shorter plants. No phytotoxic effects were observed following application of 5% X–77 and only slight curving of young leaves were noted with 10% X–77 when applied to plants after 60 or more leaves had unfolded. There was no decrease in leaf number or damage to leaf area.

Open Access

Abstract

Botrytis cinerea was shown to be seed-borne on gerbera seeds. Inoculation of seeds increased damping-off of seedlings from 5 to 90%. Benlate or Thiram at a concentration of 0.1% applied as a dip for 1, 5 or 10 minutes eliminated or reduced the post-germination mortality of seedlings.

Open Access

Abstract

Ancymidol (α-cyclopropyl-α(pmethoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidine-methanol) combined with surface active agents was tested to determine any increase of surface penetration for height control of hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla Thunb.) and Easter Lilies (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) The nonionic surfactants polyoxpropylene polyethoxyethanol dihydroxypropane (Hydrowet), polyoxyethylene polypropoxypropanol dihydroxypropane (Regulaid), and alkarylpolyoxyethylene glycols (X-77) were used. Ancymidol with the surfactant was applied on hydrangea as a foliar spray at 25, 50 or 100 ppm concentration or as a soil drench containing 1, 2 or 3 mg ai per plant. Hydrowet and Regulaid were effective when applied as a foliar spray. Only Hydrowet was effective when applied as a soil drench. Greater height control occurred with the combination of the surfactant and ancymidol as a foliar spray. Easter lilies were sprayed with ancymidol and surfactant as a foliar spray at 50 or 100 ppm concentration as a soil drench at 0.25 or 0.50 mg ai per plant. Hydrowet, Regulaid, and X-77 all increased surface penetration of ancymidol but did not increase the effectiveness of soil drenches of ancymidol.

Open Access

Abstract

Twenty gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii H. Bolus, ex Hook f.) cultivars were evaluated for longevity in deionized water (DI), deionized water containing 1 mg fluoride (F)/liter, and deionized water containing 200 mg 8-hydroxyquinoline citrate (8-HQC) + 20 g sucrose (S)/liter. Flowers of different cultivars differed in fluoride sensitivity. Sensitive cultivars developed necrosis on the tips of ray florets within 12 to 24 hr of exposure to fluoridated water, whereas the least-sensitive cultivars were injured within 4 to 6 days. Petal necrosis was the prim ary factor reducing longevity in fluoridetreated flowers. Petal necrosis did not occur on flowers held in DI or 8-HQC + S. The mean postharvest lives of the 20 cultivars held in fluoridated water, DI, and 8-HQC + S were 2.6, 5.3, and 8.3 days, respectively.

Open Access

Abstract

The effect of plant grpwth retardant, methyl-2,7-dichloro-9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylate (morphactin), was investigated on Chrysanthemum morifolium cv. Golden Yellow Princess Anne. Treatments with 10 and 20 ppm were the most effective. Pot chrysanthemums grown and pinched following accepted commercial practices were sprayed with the material. The morphactin induced more branches to develop, especially when low light intensity prevailed in mid-winter. Flower count on treated plants, grown 3 to a 6-inch azalea pot, were comparable to untreated plants grown 5 to a 6-inch pot. The branch inducing property was found to be consistent, both during the winter and summer months.

A detailed study of the distribution of diffusible and extractable auxin following morphactin spray of 20 and 100 ppm, showed that the polarity of the auxin following treatments was reduced. Extractable auxin did not seem to be affected by the treatment, when the wheat straight growth test bioassay was employed. In addition, the material caused a delay in flowering, reduced leaf size, thickened stems, and reduced cell division.

Open Access