Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for

  • Author or Editor: Andres A. Reyes x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

The virulence of Mucor mucedo (L.) Fr. (the cause of mucor rot) and Botrytis cinerea Pers. (gray mold) on vegetables stored at 13C for 7 days or 1C for 70 days varied with the host and controlled atmosphere (CA). M. mucedo was severely pathogenic at 13C to cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), eggplant (Solarium melongena L. var. esculentum Nees), pepper (Capsicum annum L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), but not to bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The fungus did not infect carrot (Daucus carota L. var. sativa DC.), celery (Apium graveolens L. var. dulce DC.), onion (Allium cepa L.), or parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L.) at 1C. B. cinerea was virulent on all of these crops at 13 or 1C. The severity of mucor rot and gray mold on eggplant stored at 13C for 14 days was suppressed most in a CA of 7.5% CO + 1.5% O2 and least in 1.5% 02, in comparison with the air control. Similarly, the growth and sporulation of each pathogen on eggplant-extract agar maintained at 13C for 4 or 14 days were suppressed most in 7.5% CO + 1.5% O2; suppression was least in 1.5% O2. The suppression of diseases on eggplant was highly correlated with the suppression of mycelial growth and sporulation of pathogens on agar.

Free access

Abstract

Celery (Apium graveolens L. var. dulce DC.) stored at 0°-1°C in 1.5% O2 had better marketable quality than that stored in air after 11 weeks. Marketable celery was improved by using 2.5-7.5% CO in the storage atmosphere, but not by 2-4% CO2. Decay was most severe on celery stored in 21% O2. Botrytis cinerea Pers. and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary were the most frequent isolates recovered from decayed celery.

Open Access

Abstract

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary and Botrytis cinerea Pers. were highly pathogenic to celery stored at 0° to 1°C in normal air (21% O2). Alternaría dauci (Kuhn) Groves & Skolko, Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb., Penicillium sp., and Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht, were nonpathogenic. An atmosphere of 7.5% CO/1.5% O2 was more suppressive to disease caused by B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum than low 1.5% O2 atmosphere alone. The 4% CO2/1.5% O2 and 0.0003% C2H4/1.5% O2 atmospheres were slightly suppressive to disease caused by S. sclerotiorum only. The 7.5% CO/1.5% O2 atmosphere also was consistently suppressive to mycelial growth, spore germination, and germ tube elongation of B. cinerea.

Open Access

Abstract

The effects of soil fumigation with Telone C-17 on yield, petiole NO3-N levels and verticillium wilt (incited by Verticillium albo-atrum Reinke & Berth and V. dahliae Kleb.) of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) grown continuously and in a 2-year rotation with corn since 1972 at 8 rates of nitrogen were studied in 1978 and 1979. Soil fumigation resulted in significant yield increases where potatoes were grown continuously. Potatoes grown in rotation responded to fumigation only in 1979. Continuous culture of potatoes resulted in reduced yields in both years. Nitrate-N levels were substantially lower in petioles from fumigated plots than in non-fumigated plots. Yield responses from fumigation and rotation were the result of reduced severity of verticillium wilt infestation. Soil fumigation and rotation had equal effects on yield and verticillium wilt, particularly in 1979.

Open Access

Abstract

Total weight loss of < 10% over a 10-week period was achieved by storing celery in atmospheres containing 1% O2 combined with 2% or 4% CO2 at 0°C. Significant increases in marketable celery resulted when C2H4 was scrubbed from some atmospheres. A combination of 1% or 2% O2 and 2% or 4% CO2 prevented black stem development during the storage period. Improved visual color, appearance, flavor, and increased marketable celery justifies the use of 4% CO2 in celery storages.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Earlirouge’ tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) was developed to replace ‘Starfire’, the common cultivar grown in eastern Ontario, Canada, in the 1960s. It was named for its earliness and bright red color of the fruit. It is now grown for the handpick fresh market tomato in Ontario and Quebec provinces of Canada and northeastern United States.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Quinte’ (ST-19) is a midseason, large, firm, crimson-colored tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.). It was developed in the early 1970s to replace ‘Moira’. Named after the Bay of Qunite, it is now extensively grown in eastern Ontario, Canada, and the northeastern United States, especially in areas where Verticillium wilt (Verticillium alboatrum Reinke & Berth, and V. dahliae Kleb.) is a problem. The fruit is suitable to the fresh-market and processed-juice industries.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Bellestar’ (ST-50) is a tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) developed for the sandy loam to clay loam soils (pH 6.0 to 7.5) of the cool regions of eastern Ontario. The cultivar satisifies the need for an early hand harvest, processing tomato with a concentrated maturity. It also can be used for the fresh market as a pick-your-own pastetype tomato. Commercial growers in the northeastern United States have received this cultivar quite well and used it in a limited planting in 1983.

Open Access

Residues of the insecticide-nematicide oxamyl in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) declined more quickly during storage at 15C in modified atmospheres consisting of 1.5% O2 + 98.5% N2 or 1.5% O2 + 4.0% CO2 + 94.5% N2 than in air. (21.0% O2 + 79.0% N2). Fruit ripened more quickly in air than in either modified atmosphere. Chemical name used: S-methyl N′,N′-dimethyl -N- (methylcarbamoyloxy)-1-thio-oxamimidate (oxamyl).

Free access