Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Amy J. MacKenzie x
Clear All Modify Search

Trichoderma harzianum Rifai, a fungus that controls soilborne pathogens, can enhance growth of several vegetable and floriculture crops. Zero, 5, or 25 g of T. harzianum (isolate T-12) peat–bran amendment was added per kilogram medium in an effort to enhance the rooting of four chrysanthemum [Dendranthema ×grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura] cultivars, two considered easy to root (`Davis' and `White Marble') and two considered hard to root (`Dark Bronze Charm' and `Golden Bounty'). Adding the T. harzianum amendment at both rates tested increased root and shoot fresh weights during 21 days of rooting, relative to the control. Supplementary treated cuttings were transplanted into nontreated growing medium after 21 days. Midway between transplant to flowering, increases in height, shoot dry weight, and root fresh and dry weight were detected in `Dark Bronze Charm' with T-12, relative to the control; increases in height, shoot fresh and dry weight, and number of nodes were detected in `Golden Bounty' with T-12. By this time, there were no detectable differences in `Davis' or `White Marble'.

Free access

Trichoderma harzianum is a well-documented biocontrol agent that has been shown to enhance rooting of chrysanthemum `White Marble'. The objective of this research was to determine if T. harzianum would enhance rooting of hard-to-root chrysanthemum cuttings. Two hard-to-root cultivars (`Dark Bronze Charm' and `Golden Bounty') and two easy-to-root cultivars (`Davis' and `White Marble') were propagated in a 1:1 peat-perlite medium amended with T. harzianum at a rate of 0, 5, or 25g/kg medium. Measurements were taken 7, 14, and 21 days after insertion of the cuttings into the medium. Interactions occurred between rate of amendment and day of measurement for some variables measured. However, overall there was increased root fresh and dry weight of all cultivars when T. harzionum rates were 5 or 25 g/kg medium. Increased root fresh and dry weight occurred on days 14 and 21 for most cultivars. Root fresh and dry weight increased with increasing rate of amendment on day 14 but there was no difference between the 5 and 25 g/kg rates on day 21. Shoot fresh weight was increased with 5 or 25 g/kg each measurement day for all cultivar except `White Marble' and shoot length was increased with 25g/kg for all cultivars.

Free access

The productivity and profitability of annual and perennial field-grown specialty cut-flower species were evaluated for the southeastern United States. Data were collected on 20 annuals and 20 perennials in 1992 and on 19 annuals and 19 perennials (10 in their second year of production) in 1993. Productivity and profitability were based on yield and stem length measurements. Yield was expressed as total number of stems harvested. Income per 30-cm center was predicted from the number of stems ≥41 cm long that were harvested. Some species had high yields but stem lengths were too short for most market outlets. Among those species that combined high yield with long stems and resulted in high profitability without major pest or postharvest problems were the perennials Achillea filipendulina Lam., Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench, Liatris spicata (L.) Willd., and Platycodon grandiflorus Jacq. A. DC. and the annuals Antirrhinum majus L., Cosmos bipinnatus Cav., Scabiosa atropurpurea L., and Zinnia elegans Jacq. Low overhead of field production coupled with productive species could prove to be profitable.

Free access