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  • Author or Editor: Allan S. Hamill x
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Research to determine protocols for greenhouse forcing of woody shrubs was initiated as part of the New Crop Research program at the University of Georgia. About 15 woody taxa were initially selected for the program based on habit, foliar qualities and flowering (if present). All plants were subjected to 1.7–4.4 °C for 0, 6, or 10 weeks in a controlled temperature cooler. Based on growth and visual characteristics, Leptodermis oblonga, Indigofera pseudotinctoria `Rose Carpet', Forsythia ×intermedia `Golden Peep' and Philadelphus coronaria `Manteau d'Hermaine' was discarded. Caryopteris x clandonensis `Sunshine Blue', Leycesteria formosa `Golden Lanterns', Sambucus nigra`Black Lace', Philadelphus coronaria`Variegata' and Physocarpus oblongifolius `Summer Wine' were investigated further. Data presented for Physocarpus suggested that cooling was not necessary for growth; however, 10 weeks of cooling resulted in the least time to finish in the greenhouse. Ten, six, and zero weeks cold resulted in 17, 10, and 7 weeks finish time respectively. Additional work conducted in 2005 and future research will be discussed.

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Combining herbicides and fungicides can improve production efficiency; however, there is little information on the effect of these mixtures on weed control and processing tomato crop response. Six field trials were conducted from 2002 to 2004 in Ontario to study the effect of rimsulfuron and thifensulfuron applied alone or in combination with metribuzin and with or without chlorothalonil or copper fungicides on processing tomato. There was no visual injury or reduction in marketable yield of processing tomato with rimsulfuron or thifensulfuron alone or when tank-mixed with chlorothalonil or copper hydroxide. Rimsulfuron, thifensulfuron, rimsulfuron plus metribuzin, and thifensulfuron plus metribuzin could be tank-mixed with chlorothalonil without a reduction in weed control. However, efficacy of rimsulfuron and thifensulfuron were reduced when tank-mixed with copper hydroxide. The reduction in weed control incited by adding copper hydroxide was overcome with a low rate (150 g·ha–1 a.i.) of metribuzin for thifensulfuron but not rimsulfuron. Application of rimsulfuron and thifensulfuron alone or with low rates of metribuzin and chlorothalonil could provide tomato growers with a single-pass treatment for the control of troublesome weeds and diseases.

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Trials were conducted over 2 years at three locations in Ontario to determine the tolerance of three sweet corn hybrids to postemergence application of nicosulfuron (25 and 50 g·ha–1), bromoxynil (280 and 560 g·ha–1), and nicosulfuron plus bromoxynil (25 + 280 g·ha–1 and 50 + 560 g·ha–1). All hybrids showed injury 7 days after treatment (DAT). The crop largely recovered from the injury in most treatments, as indicated by the ratings completed 14 and 28 DAT. However injury from the tankmix of nicosulfuron plus bromoxynil at both rates still appeared to be synergistic at 7, 14, and 28 DAT. Visual injury, height reductions and yield loss in the nicosulfuron plus bromoxynil (50 + 560 g·ha–1) treatment were more severe than in the other herbicide treatments. Yield of BSS5362 was significantly decreased in the nicosulfuron (50 g·ha–1) and nicosulfuron plus bromoxynil (50 + 560 g·ha–1) but was not affected by any other herbicide-hybrid combination. Caution must be exercised when using this tankmix combination, as there is potential to cause significant visual injury, height reductions and yield loss.

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