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  • Author or Editor: Adolph J. Laiche Jr. x
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Abstract

Southern-grown bulbs of ‘Ace’, ‘Croft’, ‘Harson’, and ‘Nellie White’ Easter lily were naturally cooled and greenhouse-forced with either constant minimum thermostat settings of 16.7 to 15.6°C or with thermostat settings lowered to 7.8 to 4.4° for 8 hours during the night to obtain a dual minimum night temperature regime. The actual greenhouse temperatures varied with outdoor temperatures. Average minimum temperatures obtained with constant and dual thermostat settings were 17.0 to 15.4° and 10.7 to 9.9°, respectively. With constant minimum temperature, 20 to 22 days less time was required to force ‘Harson’ as compared to ‘Ace’, ‘Croft’, and ‘Nellie White’. Dual night temperatures delayed flowering of the cultivars tested 9 to 13 days with a slight increase in flower number and a substantial increase in stem height. Although forcing time was increased with dual minimum temperatures, about 50% reduction in fuel usage was obtained.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Harson’ lily bulbs were precooled at 45 to 50°F for 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks in damp peat (68% moisture) or dry peat (8% moisture) and then soaked for 2 hr in a 900 ppm solution of GA or tap water prior to forcing. Bulbs precooled in damp peat for 4 to 6 weeks had the shortest stems and earliest flowering. Four weeks precooling in damp peat hastened stem emergence and flowering but reduced flower no. as compared to those precooled 6 weeks in dry peat. Bulbs GA treated and precooled 2 weeks flowered about 4 weeks earlier without a decrease in flower no. compared with bulbs precooled for 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Bulbs precooled 4 weeks in dry peat and treated with GA emerged and flowered as early as those precooled in damp peat for 4 weeks without GA or those in dry peat 6 weeks with or without GA. GA treatment hastened flowering similar to that caused by precooling in damp peat.

Open Access