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  • Author or Editor: Abdul Hakim x
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Mature green tomatoes (cv. Vibelco) were immersed in water at 42°C for 90 min or in water (42°C for 90 min) containing 2% calcium chloride prior to storage at 2 and 15°C for 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Control fruits were immersed in 20°C water for 90 min. All fruits were subject to poststorage ripening at 20°C for 6 days. Weight loss, chlorophyll and lycopene content, pH, TSS, TA, firmness, and electrolyte leakage were determined after storage or 6 days after storage. Control fruits showed lower weight loss, less lycopene content, pH, TSS, firmer but more chlorophyll content, pitting, decay, TA, and electrolyte leakage than treated fruits. Compared to hot water-treated fruits, lower pitting, decay, less chlorophyll content, and electrolyte leakage while more lycopene content, TA, and firmness were detected in combine hot water- and calcium-treated fruits. Extended storage time resulted in higher pitting and decay. Fruits stored at chilling temperature (2°C) showed higher chilling susceptibility to pitting and decay than those were stored at nonchilling temperature (15°C).

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Ethylene is produced by tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum) at a rate that is dependent on fruit size, maturity stage, and adherence of calyxes. Production rate of ethylene declined with increased maturity stages. Small fruit produced higher ethylene compared to medium or large sizes. Ethylene production is positively correlated with rate of respiration, but not with visible pitting. Fruit stored with calyx produced less ethylene than those that were stored without calyxes.

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Hot water treatment at 38, 42, 46, 50, and 54 °C for 30 60 and 90 minutes were applied to mature green tomatoes before storing at 2°C for 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Control fruit were treated at 20°C water. After storage all fruit were held at 20°C for 7 days. Control fruit showed lower weight loss, lycopene content, pH, and TSS but higher decay, chlorophyll content, TA, and more Firmness than hot-water-treated fruit. Weight loss, lycopene content, pH, and TSS were progressively increased with increased water temperature from 38 to 54°C, while chlorophyll content, TA and fruit firmness were declined. Among hot-water-treated fruit, least decay were detected in fruit treated at 46°C water 6 weeks stored fruit showed higher weight loss, more decay, lower chlorophyll and lycopene content, TSS, TA, less firmer and higher pH than those fruit stored for 2 or 4 weeks. Increased immersion time from 30 to 90 minutes resulted higher weight loss, lower decay, chlorophyll content, TA, and less firm, but higher lycopene content, TSS, and pH.

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Mature green tomatoes (cv. Vibelco) were stored at 2°C for 2, 3, and 4 weeks. Intermittent warming treatments for 12, 24, and 36 hours at 24°C were applied at the end of every week. Control Fruit were held continuously at 2°C. All fruit were subjected to poststorage ripening at 24°C for 7 days. Fruit decay, chlorophyll and lycopene content, fruit firmness, pH, TSS and TA were detected after storage or 7 days after transfer to 24°C. Results were compared between control and intermittently warmed fruit when stored at 2°C for 2, 3, and 4 weeks. Compared to fruit kept continuously at 2°C, intermittent warming at 24°C for 12, 24, and 36 hours reduced decay, increased chlorophyll disappearance, lycopene synthesis, and fruit firmness, enhanced pH and TSS, and declined TA. Fruit intermittently warmed for 36 hours/week showed the least decay, higher chlorophyll disappearance, and lycopene synthesis; retention of fruit firmness, pH, and TSS; and lower TA than fruit intermittently warmed for 12 and 24 hours/week. Decay percentage, lycopene content, pH, and TSS were increased from 2 to 4 weeks, but chlorophyll content, fruit firmness, and TA were declined.

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The possibility of using chlorophyll fluorescence for detecting internal quality of strawberry has been investigated. The mature fruit were marked and stored at 0 and 5 °C for 5, 10, and 15 days. After storage they were placed in the dark for 20 min and fluorescence measurement then was taken at the marked place with a fluorescence probe with a light intensity of 20 μmol·m–2·s–1. Samples were also taken from the marked place for laboratory analysis to determine chlorophyll and total soluble solute content. Firmenss was detected by an Instron Universal Testing Machine taking measurement at the marked section of the fruit. Rot was detected visually. Multiple regression and simple correlation were detected between fluorescence and laboratory-analyzed data. Multiple correlation coefficient (R) ranged from 0.80 to 0.97. Simple correlation (r) ranged from 0.44 to 0.89. The results of this study indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence is capable of detecting internal quality of strawberry and may potentially extend to other fruits. Feasible applications of the method include packinghouse, sorting of fruits, and parent and progeny quality assessment in a strawberry breeding program.

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