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  • Author or Editor: A. Y. Shawa x
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Abstract

Two nitrogen formulations, urea and ammonium sulfate, were applied as aqueous sprays to ‘McFarlin’ cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon, Ait.) vines at the rate of 0, 1.12, 2.24, 3.36, 4.48, and 5.60 kg N/ha at 5,50, and 80% bloom. Urea applied 3 times during bloom at 4.48 kg N/ha increased yield. The nitrogen treatments had no significant effect on soluble solids, pH, or fruit breakdown.

Open Access
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Abstract

Captan, captafol, and mancozeb at 10μg, and cupric hydroxide, ferbam, triforine-EC, and zineb at 100 μg active ingredient per ml of glucose-amended cornmeal agar completely inhibited pollen germination of ‘McFarlin’ cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) Triforine-F and triforine-WP at 10,000 μg/ml allowed some pollen germination. Captafol, mancozeb, and the 3 formulations of triforine all prevented pollen germination when suspensions, each at the concentration for field application, were spread on the surface of the medium immediately prior to seeding with pollen. Pollen failed to germinate on stigmas of cranberry flowers previously dipped into suspensions containing 10,000 μg/ml of captafol, cupric hydroxide, ferbam, and triforine-EC. Lower concentrations of these four fungicides and five others at 10,000 μg/ml had little or no effect on pollen germination in vivo. Triforine-EC applied twice during bloom at 0.33 kg active ingredient/ha significantly (P= 5%) reduced yield by 41%. While triforine-EC did not alter the number of berries produced per upright, it did result in the production of smaller and lighter berries.

Open Access

Abstract

The effectiveness of malathion as a color enhancement agent for cranberry fruit was tested in a co-operative experiment involving 7 commercial cranberry growing regions of North America. Sprays of malathion 80% EC at 21/2 lb. active ingredient/A applied either 2 or 3 weeks before harvest increased anthocyanin content of ‘McFarlin’, ‘Early Black’ and ‘Searles’ cranberries.

Open Access