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  • Author or Editor: A. P. Camilo x
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Abstract

The principal area of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) production in Brazil is in the south in the states of Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul, and Paraná. In these states, apples are grown using modern technology, and trees are propagated on size-controlling rootstocks (1). Apple production areas are limited because present cultivars have inadequate climatic adaptation and a high level of susceptibility to fungal diseases, including apple scab [Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint.], powdery mildew [Podosphaera leucotricha (Ell. & Ev.) Salm.], and bitter rot [Glomerella cingulata (Ston.) Spauld & Schrenk] (2). There is a need to develop early ripening cultivars that would make it possible to reduce the cost of chemical protection against diseases and also reduce the length of time that late-maturing apples must be stored until the beginning of the next summer's harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

Production of early ripening apples is becoming important in many areas at intermediate altitudes in southern Brazil, which have a subtropical climate with mild winters (1). However in these areas, winter temperatures only allow cultivation of apple cultivars that require ≈400 hr of chilling at <7.2°C. The cultivars Anna, Ein Shemer, and Vered from Israel, and several local cultivars, such as Rainha, Ohio Beauty, Bruckner do Brasil, and Culinaria, have satisfactory adaptation and are reasonably productive in these areas. With few exceptions, however, the fruit quality is unsatisfactory for Brazilian tastes.

Open Access