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  • Author or Editor: A. N. Kasimatis x
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Abstract

‘Thompson Seedless’ grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) were trained to heights of 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0 m with and without an 0.6-m crossarm. Data were collected from 4 seasons beginning in 1969. Within treatments variability was usually too great to reveal significant differences among treatment means for most parameters measured within a single year. Analysis of the 3-year combined results revealed that the highest trellis resulted in most yield, most clusters, and most berry sugar per vine. Vines on the lowest trellis had the least pruning brush wt. Vines with crossarms had higher wt per berry, soluble solids, sugar, and wt brush per vine than did vines without crossarms.

Open Access

Abstract

Three years of observations were made at Oakville, California, on a vineyard trial of 3 pruning severities on 2 scion grape cultivars, Chardonnay and Gamay Beaujolais, grafted onto 2 phylloxera-resistant rootstocks, ‘St. George’ and ‘A × R #1’. There was a marked increase in crop production with decreased pruning severity. With ‘Chardonnay’ on ‘St. George’ there was nearly a 3-fold increase in yield when the pruning went from 5 retained buds/lb. (453.6g) of prunings to 15 buds/lb. With ‘Gamay Beaujolais’, the yield increase approached 2-fold. Vines on ‘A × R #1’ were markedly more fruitful than those on ‘St. George’, and this rootstock difference was not influenced by pruning severity over a 3-year period.

The variability in level of pruning, as estimated from a visual inspection of individual vines, was great. This could account for both low yields and high vine sizes with ‘Chardonnay’. The pruning level used by an experienced pruner was about 8 retained buds/lb. of prunings on average-sized vines of ‘Chardonnay’ on ‘St. George’, and about 6 buds on the largest vines.

The most severe pruning was very restrictive on yields per vine, and vine vigor was enhanced at these low bud counts. Fruit maturity was delayed by the least-severe pruning level and, in some instances, vine size was reduced the following year. Under the conditions of the test site, the intermediate level of pruning severity, 10 buds/lb. of prunings, was appropriate for the small-clustered, cane-pruned cultivars at the intermediate vine sizes.

Open Access