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  • Author or Editor: A. M. Rhodes x
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Abstract

Cultivars of Cucurbita mixta Pang, have been slowly disappearing from listings in seed catalogs in the United States. Several years ago 4 cultivars were listed: ‘Green Striped Cushaw’, ‘White Cushaw,’ ‘Japanese Pie,’ and ‘Tennessee Sweet Potato.’ Today, ‘Green Striped Cushaw’ is occasionally listed. Of the other 3 cultivars, the author has recently seen only fruits of ‘White Cushaw’, which were produced by growers who save their own seed. Although these 4 cultivars of C. mixta are productive, they are very susceptible to powdery mildew, which may account for their decline in popularity.

Open Access

Abstract

Cucurbita pepo L. was found to be the best rootstock to enhance flowering of C. palmata Wats, and C. pedatifolia Bailey scions. Cucurbita ficifolia Bouché was equal to C. pepo as a rootstock for C. okeechobeensis Bailey scions. Cucurbita mixta Pang, rootstock produced flowers with the C. palmata scion. Cucurbita maxima Duch. and C. moschata Duch. ex Poir. rootstocks gave the poorest results.

Open Access

Abstract

Segregation for alcohol insoluble solids (AIS) in F2 and first backcross generations from a cross with ‘VF109’ and ‘Campbell 146’ as high and low parents, indicated 2 gene-pairs controlling AIS. Broad-sense heritability estimate for AIS was 84%, of which 62% was due to additive and 22% due to non-additive gene action. AIS had high phenotypic correlation with viscosity. The genotypic correlation was also high (r G = 0.89). The relative selection efficiency (RSE) of indirect selection, using AIS as a secondary character, was estimated to be 114% of the direct selection. Thus AIS may be useful as a secondary character for indirect selection of increased juice viscosity of tomatoes.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Two multivariate techniques, cluster analysis and principal components with varimax rotation, were applied to a model consisting of 100 characters and 30 cultivars of yams. Cluster analysis indicated 3 major groups of cultivars. Varimax solution indicated that the first component was highly loaded with anthocyanin characters; the second component with spiny vines and small tubers with long necks; and the third component, with tuber quality. Components 1 and 2 helped confirm the results of cluster analysis by delineating 3 overlapping groups of cultivars, Component 3 indicated cultivars of the 3 groups which were thought to be the most primitive because of their low quality culinary characteristics. The 2 techniques are, thus, complementary and each technique provides information not evident from the other.

Open Access

Abstract

Six sweet com (Zea mays L.) inbreds homozygous for the genes sugary (su) and sugary enhancer (se) have been developed at the Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station. The se gene is a recessive modifier of the su genotype (2) and results in increased kernel sugar content, sweetness, and tenderness (3). Kernels with the su se genotype contain amounts of sugar comparable to those found in lines homozygous for the shrunken-2 (sh 2) gene but without a concomitant reduction in phytoglycogen (water-soluble polysaccharides) content (4). The high level of phytoglycogen found in su and su se cultivars contributes to their tender, creamy texture.

Open Access

Abstract

Eleven maize inbreds homozygous for genes sugary (su) and sugary enhancer (se) were developed as a consequence of studies to characterize the effect of se with su on car bohydrates in the kernels (2, 3, 4). These inbreds should provide useful germplasm for the development of sweet com hybrids with superior culinary quality.

Open Access

Abstract

Five sugary enhancer (su se) inbreds were compared with 2 sugary (su Se) inbreds of maize (Zea mays L.) for postharvest changes in sugars and sorbitol. The level of sucrose, the predominant sugar, was 17 to 26% of dry weight for the su se inbreds, and 8 and 9% for the su Se inbreds at the time of harvest. The su se inbreds lost about the same proportion of their sucrose as the su Se inbreds during 48 hours storage at 30°C, but storage at 2° slowed or prevented the loss in both genotypes. The sucrose content of su se inbreds after 48 hours storage at 30° was still greater than that of freshly harvested su Se inbreds. For the other sugars and sorbitol, the effect of the se gene was minimal during storage. In general for both genotypes, fructose decreased and maltose increased during either storage condition. Sorbitol decreased during cool storage and increased during warm storage.

Open Access

Abstract

Two hybrid cucurbits were produced that combined the genetic production of cucurbitacins as found in the wild bitter gourds, Cucurbita andreana Naud and C. texana Gray, with the high fruit yields characteristic of the domesticated cultivars of C. maxima Duchesne and C. pepo L. Both the C. andreana × C. maxima and C. texana × C. pepo hybrids produced relatively high yields of fruit with high cucurbitacin content. Both hybrids showed promise as attractants for population estimation of corn rootworm beetles (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber and D. virgifera LeConte) or for use in poisoned baits using methomyl or trichlorfon with the bitter cut fruits or fruit homogenates.

Open Access

Abstract

A new inbred, Illinois 677a, was found to have as high a sugar content as the sh2 genotype, and both had twice as much sugar as 3 commercial su1 cultivars when compared at the eating stage.

Open Access

Abstract

The genetic variability of 20 cultivars of horseradish, Armoracia rusticana Gaertn., Mey., & Scherb., was measured and classified. These cultivars were chosen from a gene pool containing over 400 cultivars, and collectively they appeared to represent the extreme and intermediate forms of variability found in horseradish. Two methods of classification were compared. One classification was based on 2 highly diagnostic characters that showed the extreme and intermediate limits of the germplasm in the form of a scatter diagram. The other classification was based on 40 characters. For this classification methods of numerical taxonomy were used to show the germplasm complex by scatter diagrams and phenograms. The two classifications appeared to be equal in defining the extreme limits of the genetic variability. The main area of disagreement was found among the relative positions of the intermediate forms or genotypes. The use of scatter diagrams as an aid to the selection and conservation of genetic variability for future use is discussed.

Open Access