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S.O. Park, A. Dursun, D.P. Coyne, and G. Jung

Common bacterial blight (CBB), incited by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp), an important disease in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Tepary bean (P. acutifolius A. Gray) is of interest to bean breeders because of resistance to CBB. Our objective was to identify RAPD markers linked to major genes for CBB resistance using bulked segregant analysis in an F2 population from a tepary bean cross CIAT640005 (R) X Nebr#4B (S). A total of 57 RAPD primers (602 RAPD primers screened) showed polymorphisms between bulked DNA derived from R and S CBB plants. All markers showed coupling linkage with CBB resistance. A good fit to a 3:1 ratio of bands for presence and absence using 11 RAPD primers was observed in 77 F2 plants. Markers of U-15 and L-7 primers were 2.4 cM distant from the gene for resistance to Xcp strain LB-2. RAPD markers of U-10, U-20, S-12, Y-4, F-13, P-6, Q-1, and Q-ll primers were 2.4 cM distant from the gene for resistance to Xcp strain SC-4A. RAPD markers of IJ-15 and L-7 primers were 8.4 cM distant from the gene for resistance to Xcp strain EKl l. The tepary RAPD linkage group includes three molecular markers and three genes for resistance to Xcp strains EK-l l, LB-2, and SC-4A and spans a length of 19.2 cM. This data supports the presence of Xcp races.

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A. Dursun, D.P. Coyne, M.F. Mohamed, and G. Jung

Common bacterial blight, incited by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp), is a serious disease of common beans [Phaseolus vulgaris (P. v.)]. Some tepary beans (P. acutifolius) are resistant (R) to Xcp and used to breed P. v. with R to Xcp. The objective was to determine the inheritance of the reaction to different strains of Xcp in crosses between susceptible (S) and R tepary lines. The parents, F2, and F3 populations from six tepary crosses involving 3 R × S, 1 R × moderately (M) R, and 2 R × R were inoculated with Xcp strains EK-11, LB-2, and SC-4A. Different single dominant genes controlled the reaction to different Xcp isolates in R × S crosses. Coupling linkage was detected between the genes controlling the reactions to each of the Xcp strains in the crosses NE #4B(s) × NE #19(R) and NE #4B(S) × CIAT-640005(R), except for NE #8A(MR) × NE #4B(S) with strains EK-11 and LB-2 and EK-11 and SC-4A. Transgressive segregation for S was observed in the F2 and F3 NE #8A × NE #8B(R), indicating that the parents possessed different genes for R. No segregation for reactions occurred n the F2 NE #8B × NE #19 and NE #19 × CIAT-640005, indicating that these parents possessed the same genes for R to the three strains.

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S.O. Park, A. Dursun, and D.P. Coyne

Common bacterial blight (CBB), incited by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp), is an important disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Tepary bean (P. acutifolius A. Gray) is of interest to bean breeders because of resistance to CBB. The objective was to identify RAPD markers linked to major dominant genes for CBB resistance and purple flower color using bulked segregant analysis in an F2 population from a tepary bean cross Nebr#19 [resistant (R) to CBB and white flower color] × Nebr#4B [susceptible (S) to CBB and purple flower color]. Ten RAPD primers (600 RAPD primers screened) showed polymorphisms between bulked DNA derived from R and S plants. All markers showed coupling linkage with CBB resistance. The RAPD marker of G-14 primer was 5.2 cM distant from the gene for resistance to Xcp strain LB-2. The RAPD marker of L-18 primer was 6.8 cM distant from the gene for resistance to Xcp strain SC-4A. The RAPD marker of G-14 primer was 26.2 cM distant from the gene for resistance to Xcp strain EK-11. Seven RAPD primers showed polymorphisms between bulked DNA derived from purple and white flower plants. All markers showed coupling linkage with the gene for purple flower color. The RAPD marker of Y-6 primer was 3.6 cM distant from the gene for purple flower color.