Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for

  • Author or Editor: A. Berry x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Ohio 7663’ is an early-main season, machine-harvest tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) with canning quality suitable for coreless whole-pack product. It was evaluated with good results, in the Northern Tomato Exchange Program (N.T.E.P.) trials in 1977 and 1978 and in other tests in Midwestern United States and Canada.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Ohio 736’ is an early, well-adapted machine-harvest tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) with superior canning quality.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Ohio 8243’ is a main season tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) adapted for machine harvest and bulk handling and exhibits processing quality especially suitable for the production of peeled, coreless whole-canned tomatoes (whole-pack), as well as for juice and sauce. Extensive test acreages have been grown by the mid-western and eastern U.S. and Canadian tomato processing industries. The new cultivar has been well received by growers and processors and its use is increasing.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Ohio 7870’ is an early-main season tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suitable for machine harvest with fruit qualities for the cannery that make it especially suitable for the production of juice, sauce, and coreless whole-canned tomato (whole-pack). It was released by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, June 1981.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Ohio 7681’ is an early-main season tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suitable for hand or machine harvest, released by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, September 1980. Canning quality favors juice and puree production.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Ohio 7814’ is an early season tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) adapted for machine harvest and bulk handling. Processing quality is especially suitable for the production of viscosity products and peeled, coreless, whole-canned tomatoes. It was released in November 1982 by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Ohio 832’ is an early, main-season, processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suitable for hand or machine harvest with fruit qualities that make it especially suitable for juice, sauce, and coreless whole-pack. ‘Ohio 832’ was released by Ohio State Univ., 3 Oct 1985. Several thousand acres of this tomato have been grown by the processing industry in the eastern and mid-western United States. It has been well received by growers and processors and use is increasing.

Open Access

Abstract

The use of municipal wastewater for horticultural production on the surface appears to be a very simple concept (2, 10, 12). In its simplest form it is the use of a waste product of one process as the raw material for a second process. However, if the best use of the combination of the 2 systems is to be made, it will be necessary to maximize the sum of the 2 systems rather than of each individual system. These 2 systems, horticulture and municipal wastewater, are interfaced by a number of mutual components which are mineral nutrients, CO2, water and heat. The heat and CO2 can only be taken advantage of under controlled environmental conditions, with a bare minimum being greenhouse conditions, while all horticultural operations can utilize the nutrients and water (5).

Open Access

Abstract

Reclaimed, secondary-treated municipal wastewater after chlorination and ponding is being used as the sole source of water and mineral nutrients in research studies on the hydroponic culture of ornamental and vegetable crops. A feasibility study is in progress to determine if greenhouse crops (e.g. tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and chrysanthemums) can be produced using secondary-treated effluent as a water nutrient source, while at the same time removing sufficient primary nutrients and perhaps trace elements to also function as a tertiary treatment process. The cover photo of tomatoes illustrates the type of production achieved. Secondary-treated municipal wastewater constitutes an attractive alternative source of water and fertilizer nutrients for crop production since the nutrients present in the wastewater are already in a usable form and do not require any additional energy input to make them available to plants. At the same time, the removal of nutrients from waste-water during crop production would reduce the pollution load that inherently remains after secondary treatment. Additionally, when these two processes are combined in the same operation, the heat and carbon dioxide produced as byproducts in treatment processes could be used to enhance crop production. Thus, the combined processes could constitute a more attractive, economic alternative than the sums of the two separate operations.

Open Access

Abstract

Efficiency of somaclone production was examined using 10 processing tomato cultivars and 18 growth regulator treatments. Although zeatin has been reported to induce shoot development most readily, a combination of IAA (5.7 µmol·liter–1) and kinetin (4.7 µmol·liter–1) was found to be equal to zeatin in shoot regeneration efficiency and reduced the time required for shoot production. Rooting was achieved by transplanting the in vitro-produced shoots to Pro-Mix under intermittent mist in a greenhouse. Chemical names used: (E)-2-methyl-4-(1H-purin-6-ylamino)-2-buten-1-ol (zeatin); 1H-indole-3-acetic acid (IAA); N-1-furanyImethyl)-1-H-purin-6-amine (kinetin).

Open Access