Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Y. Desjardins x
  • HortScience x
Clear All Modify Search

Microtubers (Solanum tuberosum cv Snowden) were produced in 1-L jar fermentors using a two-step method consisting of a shoot multiplication phase (21 days) followed by a tuberization phase (25 days). The plantlets were immersed in Murashige and Skoog (MS) liquid medium for 3.5 min every 4 h. Low concentrations of ancymidol (anti-gibberellic substance), particularly during the shoot multiplication phase, were essential for tuber initiation and development. A continuous supply of 2 μMol ancymidol during the two phases of culture decreased plant height, but produced >100 microtubers per jar. Although the tuber development phase was short (25 d), 25% of the microtubers produced were >0.5 g with 17.5% to 18.0% of dry-matter content.

Free access

In Quebec, commercial sod is produced on >3000 ha. Generally, ≈20 months are required to produce market-ready sod. When conditions are suitable, harvest of marketable sod is possible within a year. However, intensive management may result in soil compaction and a reduction of the organic matter content. Considering the increasing amount of amendment available, sod production fields could be interesting for their disposal. In this study, visual quality and sod root growth was examined following an application of an organic amendment at 50, 100, and 150 t·ha–1, incorporated to depth of 6 or 20 cm. Plots established on a sandy soil receiving organic amendments had higher visual quality ratings. Bulk density was significantly reduced following compost or paper sludge application to a heavy soil. The shearing strength required to tear sod amended with compost was significantly higher in comparison with control and paper sludge treatments.

Free access

The objective of this study was to compare the effects of the foliar application of CaCl2 on the shelf life and Ca content of the fruit of the strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars Kent and Glooscap, which differ in fruit firmness. Calcium was applied repeatedly, 3 days, 3 and 6 days, or 3, 6, and 9 days before harvest at 0, 10, or 20 kg·ha-1. Calcium treatment influenced amounts of free sugars and organic acids, color, texture, and disease development during storage in air at 4C. Calcium application had more effect on the fruit of the softer `Glooscap', which contained relatively low levels of Ca at the time of treatment. Calcium content of the fruit appeared to depend mainly on the ability of the plant to accumulate and distribute Ca.

Free access