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  • Author or Editor: Wayne B. Sherman x
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Abstract

Heterosis for embryo length was observed in interspecific crosses between the peach clones ‘Flordaking’ and FL 82–27, and ‘Nonpareil’ almond. No consistent differences in embryo length were observed in peach when selfing was compared to outcrossing to the unrelated peach selection FL 9-26C.

Open Access

Abstract

Native highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) from the flatwoods of Alachua County (North-central), Florida and from Highlands County (Central peninsula) were surveyed for chromosome number and crossability with breeding lines derived from northern highbush cultivars. The Alachua County population was predominately tetraploid; a diploid component differed in leaf serration and glandulation. Tetraploid plants were fully cross-fertile with highbush cultivars and breeding lines. Diploid plants from the Alachua County population were cross fertile with both V. elliottii and V. darrowi. V. corymbosum from Highlands County was diploid.

Open Access

Abstract

‘TropicSnow’ peach is released jointly by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station of the Texas A&M Univ. System and the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Univ. of Florida.

Open Access

Abstract

‘TropicBeauty’ peach is released jointly by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station of the Texas A&M Univ. System and the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Univ. of Florida.

Open Access

Abstract

Interspecific hybridization is a technique commonly used by plant breeders to transfer genes from one species to another. Interspecific hybrids are usually obtained with greater difficulty than intraspecific hybrids because genetic barriers to hybridization usually increase with an increase in genetic unrelatedness (6, 11, 18, 41). Breeders resort to interspecific hybridization only when the characters are absent or inadequately expressed at the intraspecific level. Stone-fruit breeders have made much use of interspecific hybridization in the improvement of Prunus cultivars and rootstocks (3, 5, 6, 8, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 28, 34, 36, 37, 41, 42, 43) particularly in the subgenus Prunophora (plums), because plum species tend to intercross more freely than do members of other subgenera (41, 42). This paper will review the problems that have been encountered in making interspecific Prunus hybrids and the techniques that have been used to overcome them. In addition, techniques are presented that have been employed successfully with other interspecific hybridizations which may have application for Prunus.

Open Access

Some nonmelting flesh (NMF) peaches develop a characteristic off-flavor during postharvest ripening. A study was conducted using NMF genotypes from the Univ. of Florida breeding program to investigate the off-flavor development in melting flesh (MF) and NMF peach genotypes and to determine the compositional changes associated with the development of off-flavor during postharvest ripening at 8 °C. The study revealed that there were certain chemical components that were consistently associated with the occurrence of off-flavor. Generally, there was a significant increase in total soluble phenolics, polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activity and ethanol content with the increase in the percentage of off-flavored fruit with time in storage at 8 °C in NMF genotypes examined. However, total sugars and total soluble solids decreased significantly during the storage period. These changes in chemical composition of NMF genotypes were not observed in MF genotypes, which did not show off-flavor development. Moreover, highly significant linear correlations were detected between off-flavor development and soluble phenolics, PPO activity, ethanol content, total soluble solids, and sugars in Fla. 92-21C and USDA 87P285, which had the highest percentage of off-flavored fruit. Specifically, soluble phenolics, chlorogenic acid, PPO activity, and ethanol were positively correlated, but soluble sugars and soluble solids were negatively correlated with the off-flavor development. Thus, it is suggested that the accumulation of soluble phenolic compounds and ethanol, and the reduction of soluble solids and sugars contribute to the of off-flavor in NMF genotypes.

Free access