Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Author or Editor: W. E. Ballinger x
  • HortScience x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

Abstract

Sand culture experiments with many treatments offer opportunities to apply a solution to the wrong container or plant. Such errors may destroy the treatment differences and, therefore, the experiment. Often it is necessary to depend on untrained personnel for the routine day-after-day application of solutions; this increases chance for error. Therefore, a system of number-color-coding has proven of great value.

Open Access

Abstract

Since the techniques of column, paper, thin layer, and gas chromatography are playing a rapidly increasing role in horticultural laboratories and in the interests of horticulturists, two papers on chromatography technique are presented in this issue. W. E. Ballinger and Eleanor P. Maness of North Carolina State University offer an improvement in paper chromatography which has enabled them to materially increase laboratory productivity in the separation of anthocyanins from blueberries. M. Allen Stevens of Campbell Research Institute briefly, but concisely, surveys the principles of gas chromatography and illustrates several horticultural research potentials with this new medium.

Open Access

Abstract

Eight lines (2 cultivars and 6 selections) of Euvitis grapes in 1982 were stored for 4, 6, 7, and 8 weeks at 0° ± 0.5°C without sulfur dioxide (SO2) generators and for 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks with SO2 generators in 5.7-liter telescoping, corrugated cardboard shipping containers with polyethylene liners. Grapes stored without SO2 were of poorer appearance after 4 weeks than those stored with SO2 after 8 weeks. After 16 weeks of storage with SO2, 4 of the 8 lines still had appearance ratings similar to those before storage. Overall, good flavor was maintained over 7 weeks without SO2 and over 12 weeks with SO2. During 8 weeks of storage without SO2, 6 of the 8 lines developed 23% to 60% decay. In contrast, 6 of the 8 lines stored with SO2 for 16 weeks developed 3% or less decay. SO2 injury (percentage by number) ranged from 0% to 59% but was judged to be objectionable in flavor or appearance in only 2 instances. All lines stored well for 12 weeks with SO2. Of the 8 lines, ‘Suffolk Red’ was judged to be outstanding. After 20 weeks of storage with SO2, ratings of its appearance and flavor were equal to those before storage; decay was only 3.5%.

Open Access

Abstract

Irrigation did not influence total yield, growth, or longevity of ‘Elberta’ or ‘Redhaven’ peach trees. Yields were depressed when N was reduced to 0.2 kg/tree (approx 1/2 recommended rate) with both cultivars. Increasing N above the recommended rate did not influence yield. Highest yields were obtained with lightest pruning level but fruit size was reduced. Random tree loss occurred with all treatments but was highest with low N rates.

Open Access

Abstract

Fruit anthocyanins (ACY) of eight Prunus spp. representing two subgenera (subg.) and three sections (sect.) were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fruit of P. angustifolia Marsh., P. hortulana Bailey, and P. maritima Marsh. all North American members of subg. Prunus sect. Prunocerasus, were qualitatively identical in ACY composition, containing cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. Fruit of P. cerasifera Ehrh. and P. spinosa L., both Eurasian members of subg. Prunus sect. Prunus, contained small amounts of peonidin-3-gIuco-side and peonidin-3-rutinoside, in addition to the 3-glucoside and 3-rutinoside of cyanidin. Fruit of P. besseyi Bailey and P. pumila L. (subg. Lithocerasus sect. Microcerasus) contained cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. Fruit of P. pumila also contained trace amounts of peonidin-3-rutinoside. Fruit of P. japonica Thunb., a Chinese member of subg. Lithocerasus sect. Microcerasus, showed a complex ACY profile distinct from P. besseyi and P. pumila.

Open Access