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  • Author or Editor: W. A. Frazier x
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William Alan Frazier (Tex), like his predecessor, Neil Stuart, was born in 1908 and received his graduate degrees from the University of Maryland in the 30‘s. He graduated with honors from Texas A & M in 1930 with a BS in Horticulture.

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Abstract

I wish to comment and reflect a bit about the interaction of horticulture, plant breeding, and genetic engineering.

Open Access

Abstract

Threshing of large numbers of seed samples encountered in bean breeding programs has been a difficult problem to solve satisfactorily. In many cases, threshing has been done by hand with the aid of a small blower. Actual seed recovery is relatively efficient but it is painfully slow and tedious. With this method one person can normally thresh 10 to 15 small samples per hour.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon Cherry’ is a highly determinate, compact, fruitful, and early maturing cultivar. Developed in the Willamette Valley of Western Oregon, it should be adapted to cool summer areas where most cherry tomato culti-vars are late to mature. Similar to the F1 hybrid ‘Small Fry’ in fruit size and quality, ‘Oregon Cherry’ is less vegetative and vigorous, but more concentrated in fruit set, and generally earlier in production pattern. This cultivar should be useful in home gardens and for early fresh market production. It should be superior to most existing cultivars where a compact plant and earliness are needed.

Open Access

Abstract

Oregon T5-4 is a tomato breeding line with a strong tendency for early parthenocarpic fruit set under cool conditions. Extreme earliness in T5-4 is associated with early flowering, the ability to set seedless fruit under low temperature, and possibly with fast ripening of seedless fruit. Although the line lacks uniformity and crack resistance, and has poor color, it has good flavor and could be used in home gardens in areas with a climate similar to that of western Oregon. The principal value of T5-4, however, should be in breeding small to medium-sized tomatoes for cool northern and coastal areas.

Open Access

Abstract

Oregon 11 is an extremely early tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) of small to medium size that has a strong tendency for parthenocarpic fruit set under cool summer conditions. Oregon 11 flowers early and sets fruit under the cool conditions encountered in western Oregon. It was released for breeding purposes and trial in home gardens, where it may be useful in providing ripe fruit before larger, higher quality cultivars begin to ripen.

Open Access

Abstract

By periodic sampling, seasonal patterns of the development of Fusarium root rot were studied in resistant and susceptible bean cultivars. Infection severity increased rapidly from the first sampling date, dropped off after the second or third, and again increased until the end of the season. In most cases, cultivar differences were apparent at any time after the second sampling, but resistant and susceptible cultivars could best be differentiated during the middle of the season. Sample variation was high, showing the potential for error in making single plant selections or in using small samples to compare cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

Lines Oregon 4, 5, 6, and 14 carrot CDaucus carota L.) were released for breeding or further selection, after the Oregon State University breeding program was terminated in 1978. These lines were developed at Corvallis with consistent exposure to wet autumn weather and are considered to have useful resistance to cracking and rotting under such conditions. They are primarily for processing use, and have shown good quality when canned or frozen, with deep orange to red-orange color and little occurrence of green core.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon Trail’ combines ‘Blue Lake’ flavor, color, and texture in a large pod borne on a bush plant. It differs from other bush green bean cultivars (1–5) recently released by Oregon State University in its longer pod and slightly less concentrated bearing habit. ‘Oregon Trail’ is recommended primarily for home gardens but may be useful also for processing or fresh market where large sieve pods are acceptable.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon 17’ is an early maturing bush green bean of ‘Blue Lake’ pod type. Its use may permit an earlier beginning of operations by Oregon processors. ‘Oregon 17’ is about two days earlier than ‘Oregon 1604’, a standard cultivar for commercial canners in western Oregon. ‘Oregon 17’ should yield less than ‘Oregon 1604.’ However, this deficiency may be offset by greater processing efficiency of ‘Oregon 17’ pods, which are smoother and straighter than those of ‘Oregon 1604’.

Open Access