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  • Author or Editor: Vince D’Antonio x
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Abstract

A technique for collection and storage of viable celery (Apium graveolens L.) pollen is reported for the cv. Tall Utah 52-70R and the annual strain A143. Umbels at anthesis were dried in an incubator for 14 hr at 31°C, crushed by hand, and passed through a sieve. The pollen released by this operation was collected on a sheet of paper and stored in gelatin capsules. High drying temperatures were detrimental to pollen viability. Pollen collection at different times of the day did not affect viability. After 6 days at 24°, a significant percentage of pollen grains was still viable. The viability declined close to 0% in 9 to 12 days. Pollen of A143 survived better than that of ‘T.U. 52-70R’. Pollen stored for 9 months at 4° maintained a viability of 45% to 50%, but declined close to 0% by the 18th month. Pollen stored at −10° maintained a viability of 10% to 30% by the 18th month. Storage of celery pollen at −10° for 6 to 9 months will keep enough viability for pollinations. Use of stored viable pollen will help with the crossing of celery, as it is often difficult to synchronize the flowering of different plants.

Open Access

Abstract

Hybridization in celery is a difficult task faced by the breeder due to the complex floral biology. Celery flowers are hermaphroditic but protandrous and are arranged in compound inflorescences or umbels, formed by small groups of flowers or umbellets disposed in whorls (3). The different developmental stages of the flowers in the umbel makes it difficult to control pollinations effectively. Pollen from young flowers will pollinate old ones that have receptive stigmas in the same inflorescence or anywhere else on the plant. Honma (4) reported a useful technique for celery hybridization, which is the standard procedure used today by breeders. The accuracy of this method depends on the faithful drop of stamens before any of the stigmas become receptive; otherwise, accidental self-pollinations will occur.

Open Access