Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • Author or Editor: U.L. Yadava x
  • HortScience x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

Two-year-old trees of `Red Flesh' (RDF) and `Lucknow-49' (L49) guavas from India and `Beaumont' (BMT) guava from Hawaii were established in the field during Spring 1995, inside an open wooden structure equipped with electric heaters and fans. Trees were cold-protected from November to the middle of April by covering the wooden structure with 6-mil clear polyethylene and using heaters and fans. Trees of RDF grew compact, while those of L49 and BMT were open, upright, and grew taller. Other than blossom-end rot on few fruits, no incidents of insect-pest and diseases were observed on trees or fruits. All cultivars bloomed from March to June 1996. Fruit set was heavier on BMT and L49 than on RDF trees. Fruit harvest extended from Sept. 1996 to Jan. 1997. Cultivar significantly influenced harvest and fruit weight. Peak harvest date was earlier for BMT, followed by RDF and then L49. Mean fresh weight (g/fruit) was 535.7, 284.2, and 150.7 for RDF, L49, and BMT, respectively. Fully developed RDF fruits were round, sometimes flat vertically, with blush on green skin when ripe, and had a small core in red flesh. Fruits of BMT were round to elliptical, yellow when ripe, and had numerous seeds in red flesh. Fruits of L49 varied from round to elliptical to pyriform with yellow to light green skin color and cream flesh with fewer seeds in a large core. The fruit flavor was strong and astringent for both BMT and L49, whereas RDF had a mild fruit flavor.

Free access
Author:

A planting of 48 trees of `Redhaven' scion on Lovell, Nemaguard, and Wildpeach rootstocks (RS) was established in 1990, with four replications in randomized complete-block design. Cultural practices common in Georgia were used to maintain the planting. Orchard performance for peach tree short life (PTSL) related tree survival, RS suckering, fungal gummosis, and tree stresses from cold injury and Pseudomonas canker, was investigated to examine RS potential of Wildpeach compared with Lovell and Nemaguard. Trees on all RS showed 100% survival for the first 5 years in the orchard. Although canker became more prevalent in later years, trees had significantly higher ratings on Nemaguard (2.88) and Lovell (2.50) RS than on Wildpeach (1.44). However, PTSL stress enraged by Pseudomonas killed one tree each on Lovell and Wildpeach RS during 1995. Trunk cambial browning that estimated cold injury was trivial due to mild winters; however, trees on Nemaguard had higher TCB ratings (1.25) than on other RS. Trees on Wildpeach had fewer suckers than on Nemaguard or Lovell. Gummosis ratings were higher on Nemaguard RS than on Lovell and Wildpeach. The results showed that Wildpeach has good potential for a peach RS.

Free access
Author:

Three exotic lines (Dwarf, L-45, and L-50) of precocious papaya (Carica papaya L.) from India, were grown in nursery rows at the Fort Valley State College Agricultural Research Farm during 1986-1990. Performance of these lines was evaluated for their adaptation and production feasibility under the growing conditions of Middle Georgia. Two lines (L-50 and Dwarf papaya) showed a less satisfactory overall performance than did L-45, which had the highest female to male ratio (7:3) and abundantly produced tree-ripened fruits under cold protection frames during 1989 and 1990. Tree growth and survival for L-45 were greater than those for L-50 and Dwarf papaya lines. Two-month-old greenhouse-grown seedlings when established in the field in April, flowered in 60 to 65 days following transplanting. Under Georgia conditions, fruits ripened on trees in approximately 150 days after fruit set. During 1989-90, the fruit size on L-45 trees varied from 574 g to 2,286 g (mean 1,530 g) with an average of 22.5 fruits per tree. Four years data suggest that papaya can be a successful annual crop if shelter is provided during late fall to protect ripening fruits and trees from frost/cold.

Free access
Authors: and

Petiole discs from young leaves of female papaya (L-45) plants were cultured in MS or B5-based media containing 0, 2.25, 4.5, 11.25, and 22.5 μm 2,4-D. Compact embryogenic callus emerged from vascular tissue of petiole discs in about 3 weeks. In MS medium, 66% and 51% explants formed embryogenic callus with 11.25 and 22.5 μm 2,4-D, respectively. On the other hand, 79% explants formed embryogenic callus in B5-based medium with 4.50 μm 2,4-D. However, explants became necrotic in B5-based medium with 22.5 μm 2,4-D. Subculturing callus in auxin-free medium resulted in the development of roots or somatic embryos. Microscopic observations revealed that the roots were produced only by the callus that had retained its continuity with the vascular tissue. This investigation revealed that petioles from field grown papaya plants are potential explants for somatic embryogenesis and 2-week exposure to 2,4-D is adequate for inducing morphogenesis. Additionally, an interaction between 2,4-D and the components in the MS and B5-based media was observed.

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

Trunk bark thickness of 6 peach clones was significantly affected by seedling root-stocks of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch). Of the 7 rootstocks tested, Siberian C invariably induced the thickest bark in the scion while Lovell and Halford induced the thinnest scion bark. However, Siberian C grown as unbudded seedling trees did not produce thicker bark than the other rootstocks, similarly grown. The effect was not site- or cultivar-dependent.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Abscisic acid (ABA) at 1 and 10 μg/ml concn supplied to growing plants of ‘EM XVIa’ (very vigorous) through grafted living conduits of the same tissue and of ‘EM IX’ (very dwarfing) was inhibitory to growth during the first 10-14 days of treatment. The ‘EM IX’ tissues also had an inhibitory effect of their own, which ABA enhanced. The higher concn was more inhibitory but not proportionately so. During the first 10 days, 1 μg/ml ABA markedly reduced solution absorption below that of water. Absorption of all solutions by ‘EM IX’ tissues was in all cases less than by those of ‘EM XVIa’. A drastic decrease in absorption was evident after 10 days.

Open Access

Abstract

Visual rating scales were developed for evaluating tissue injury in peach trees [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] in the orchard due to cold/winter temperatures and bacterial canker (Pseudomonas syringae van Hall) development. The numerical ratings on a scale of 1 to 9 separately describe key stages of damage and its severity due to cold and bacterial canker and are portrayed pictorially for clarity. Accurate estimation of tree status at very early stages of injury and good correlation with ultimate tree survival have been possible through the use of these rating scales. This information has been incoporated in the data collection for a regional research project dealing with the development and evaluation of rootstocks for peach in the southern United States and also is under consideration for use in another regional project involving peach in addition to apple, pear, and cherry.

Open Access

Interactions between irradiance levels (5–40 μmol·m-2·s-1) and iron chelate sources (FeEDTA and FeEDDHA) were observed for Carica papaya shoot tip cultures during both the establishment and proliferation stages of microculture. Reduced levels of irradiance (5 μmol·m-2·s-1) favored shoot tip establishment regardless of the source or level of iron. However, the highest percentage of successful explant establishment (100%), and significantly greater leaf length (1.16 cm; over double the size attained in any other treatment), resulted when a low concentration of FeEDTA alone was used at low irradiance. During the subsequent shoot proliferation stage, however, higher irradiance levels (30 and 40 μmol·m-2·s-1) were required, and FeEDTA failed to support culture growth when used as the sole iron source. The highest multiplication rates (3.6 shoots per explant) and leaf chlorophyll concentrations (0.22 mg/g fresh mass), and significantly improved shoot quality were achieved at 30 μmol·m-2·s-1 irradiance when both iron chelate formulations were combined (each at a 100 μM concentration) in the proliferation medium. Chemical names used: benzylamino purine (BA); ferric disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate or FeNa2EDTA (FeEDTA); ferric monosodium ethylenediamine di(o-hydroxyphenylacetate), (FeNaEDDHA) or Sequestrene 138Fe (FeEDDHA); indoleacetic acid (IAA); 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

Free access

Abstract

Effects of 8 peach seedling rootstocks on tree growth, survival, and fruit yield of ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Loring’ peach scion cultivars were tested in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Lovell seedling rootstock was a standard for comparison. Six years of data indicated that Siberian C was not an acceptable rootstock because tree survival and fruit yield were low. Halford was equivalent to Lovell for tree growth, fruit yield, and survival. Fruit size was unaffected by rootstock. Nemaguard and 2 North Carolina selections were resistant to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) but they were not resistant to ring nematodes [Criconemella xenoplax (Raski) Luc and Raski]. Soil fumigation improved tree survival in nematode-infested soil.

Open Access