Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Toyoki Kozai x
  • HortTechnology x
Clear All Modify Search

We report the results of serial studies aimed at clarifying several factors affecting organogenesis in rhizome culture of temperate Cymbidium species and their hybrids. The growth patterns and regeneration ability of rhizomes derived from asymbiotic seed or shoot tip culture vary according to media composition, kinds and concentrations of plant growth regulators, culture conditions, and species and varieties. N6-benzyladenine was the best cytokinin for inducing shoot formation, for switching rhizome tissues into protocorm-like bodies, and for directly forming multiple shoots from branched rhizomes. Activated charcoal appeared to be necessary for producing healthy plantlets and for stimulating shoot growth at levels of 0.1% to 0.3% but concomitantly decreased rhizome growth. Sucrose at 5% was the most effective concentration for shoot induction from rhizomes. The above results support the conclusion that organogenic pathways between tropical, subtropical, and temperate Cymbidium species may be controlled by the genetic backgrounds of the species or cultivars.

Full access

An improved forced ventilation micropropagation system was designed with air distribution pipes for uniform spatial distributions of carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and other environmental factors to enhance photoautotrophic growth and uniformity of plug plantlets. Single-node stem cuttings of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. `Beniazuma'] were photoautotrophically (no sugar in the culture medium) cultured on a mixture of vermiculite and cellulose fibers with half-strength Murashige and Skoog basal salts in a scaled-up culture vessel with an inside volume of 11 L (2.9 gal). CO2 concentration of the supplied air and photosynthetic photon flux on the culture shelf were maintained at 1500 μmol·mol-1 and 150 μmol·m-2·s-1, respectively. Plantlets grown in forced ventilation systems were compared to plantlets grown in standard (natural ventilation rate) tissue culture vessels. The forced (F) ventilation treatments were designated high (FH), medium (FM), and low (FL), and corresponded to ventilation rates of 23 mL·s-1 (1.40 inch3/s), 17 mL·s-1 (1.04 inch3/s), and 10 mL·s-1 (0.61 inch3/s), respectively, on day 12. The natural (N) ventilation treatment was extremely low (NE) at 0.4 mL·s-1 (0.02 inch3/s), relative to the forced ventilation treatments. On day 12, the photoautotrophic growth of plantlets was nearly two times greater with the forced ventilation system than with the natural ventilation system. Plantlet growth did not significantly differ among the forced ventilation rates tested. The uniformity of the plantlet growth in the scaled-up culture vessel was enhanced by use of air distribution pipes that decreased the difference in CO2 concentration between the air inlets and the air outlet.

Full access

Autotrophic micropropagation has advantages over conventional micropropagation and can reduce costs of plantlet production. In this article, we describe advantages of autotrophic micropropagation and a practical and formulated method of enriching culture rooms with CO2.

Full access

Sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., `Beniazuma'] plantlets were grown photoautotrophically (without sugar) for 12 days in an improved forced ventilation system designed with air distribution pipes for uniform spatial distributions of carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration. Enriched CO2 conditions and photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) were provided at 1500 μmol·mol-1 and 150 μmol·m-2·s-1, respectively. The forced (F) ventilation treatments were designated high (FH), medium (FM), and low (FL), corresponding to ventilation rates of 23 mL·s-1 (1.40 inch3/s), 17 mL·s-1 (1.04 inch3/s), and 10 mL·s-1 (0.61 inch3/s), respectively, on day 12. The natural (N) ventilation treatment was extremely low (NE) at 0.4 mL·s-1 (0.02 inch3/s), relative to the forced ventilation treatments. Total soluble sugar (TSS) and starch content were determined on day 12. Total soluble sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose) of FH plantlets were lowest in leaf tissue and highest in stem tissue as compared to other ventilation treatments. Starch concentration was higher in leaf tissue of FH or FM plantlets as compared to that of FL or NE plantlets. Plantlets subjected to FH or FM treatments exhibited significantly higher net photosynthetic rates (NPR) than those of the other treatments; and on day 12, NPR was almost five times higher in the FH or FM treatment than the FL or NE treatments. Carbohydrate concentration of plantlets was also influenced by the position of the plantlets in the vessel. Within the forced ventilation vessels, leaf TSS of FH and FM plantlets was similar regardless of whether plantlets were located near the inlet or outlet of CO2 enriched air. However, under FH or FM conditions, leaf starch concentration was higher in plantlets located closest to the CO2 inlet as compared to the outlet.

Full access