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  • Author or Editor: Teryl R. Roper x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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The source of photosynthate for developing cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) fruit can be partitioned spatially among new growth acropetal to fruit, 1-year-old leaves basipetal to fruit, and adjacent uprights along the same runner. Cranberry uprights were labeled with 14CO2 in an open system with constant activity during flowering or fruit development. When new growth acropetal to fruit was labeled, substantial activity was found in flowers or fruit. Little activity was found in basipetal tissues. When 1-year-old basipetal leaves were labeled, most of the activity remained in the labeled leaves, with some activity in flowers or fruit. Almost no labeled C moved into acropetal tissues. When new growth of adjacent nonfruiting uprights on the same runner were labeled, almost no activity moved into the fruiting upright. These data confirm that new growth acropetal to developing flowers and fruit is the primary source of photosynthate for fruit development. Furthermore, they show that during the short time studied in our experiment, almost no C moved from one upright to another.

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`Searles' (low yielding) and `Stevens' (high yielding) cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) tissues were collected in 1990 and 1991 to determine the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates in above-ground (uprights, woody stems) and below-ground tissue. Uprights had the highest total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) concentration, followed by woody stems, while below-ground tissue contained the lowest TNC concentration. Total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration in uprights increased early in the season, reached a maximum in late May, decreased as flowering approached, and remained low from late June to late August. The latter period corresponds to flowering, fruit set, floral initiation, and fruit development stages. In late August, when fruit were full size, TNC levels increased, reaching highest concentration in November as the plants were entering dormancy. Most TNC increase in the early season and the subsequent decrease were due to changes in starch. The increase of TNC late in the season was primarily due to increases in soluble carbohydrates. Total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration was greater in vegetative than fruiting uprights for the entire growing season. The lower TNC concentration in fruiting than vegetative uprights during flowering and fruit set was due to greater starch depletion in fruiting uprights. Seasonal changes in TNC in the two cultivars were similar; however, `Stevens' had generally higher TNC concentration and total dry weight as well as more fruiting uprights, fruit, and fruit weight per ground area. The low TNC concentration observed during fruit set and development suggests that the demands for carbohydrates are highest during that period and supports the hypothesis that competition for carbohydrate resources is one factor responsible for low cranberry fruit set.

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The effects of rootstock on growth of fruit cell number and size of `Gala' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) were investigated over three consecutive seasons (2000-02) growing on Malling 26 (M.26), Ottawa-3, Pajam-1, and Vineland (V)-605 rootstocks at the Peninsular Agricultural Research Station near Sturgeon Bay, WI. Fruit growth as a function of cell division and expansion was monitored from full bloom until harvest using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cell count and cell size measurements showed that rootstock had no affect on fruit growth and final size even when crop load effects were removed. Cell division ceased about 5 to 6 weeks after full bloom (WAFB) followed by cell expansion. Fruit size was positively correlated (r 2 = 0.85) with cell size, suggesting that differences in fruit size were primarily a result of changes in cell size rather than cell number or intercellular space (IS).

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Abstract

Potted sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) trees, grown under constant environmental conditions, were used to determine characteristics of leaf photosynthetic development separate from environmental influences. A maximum rate of photosynthesis of 38 mg CO2/dm2 (per hour) was reached at a leaf plastochron index (LPI) of 10, which is about 80% of full leaf expansion. During development, CO2 compensation points decreased to about 25 μl·liter−1 CO2 at LPI 12, but gradually increased to a value of about 35 for mature leaves. Of 3 leaf ages studied, (LPI 5, 10, and 15) response to low O2 was the least at LPI 10. Carboxylation efficiency doubled between LPI 5 and 10, while stomatal conductance was highest and mesophyll resistance was lowest from about LPI 10 to 13. Light saturation occurred at about 500 μmol·s−1·m−2, and optimal temperature for photosynthesis in sweet cherry was 19° to 25°C. Light and temperature effects were apparently independent of leaf age. Our results indicate major influences of leaf development on photosynthesis in sweet cherry and serve as the basis of continuing studies aimed at the importance of leaf developmental stage for cultural and production practices.

Open Access

Abstract

Source–sink relationships in sweet cherry were altered by girdling limbs both above and below fruiting spurs. Spurs isolated by girdling both above and below had lower total fruit weight per spur and lower weight per fruit then those above or below girdles. Fruit number per spur was not altered, but soluble solids and fruit color were lower in fruits from isolated spurs than fruit from spurs either above or below girdles. Fruit on spurs above girdles were generally highest in soluble solids and fruit color. These factors indicate fruit on isolated spurs also were delayed in maturity. Spurs below girdles were unaffected by girdling. Girdling had no effect on spur leaf net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, or fruit water loss rate. The results indicate that spur leaves alone do not have the capacity to support fruit growth in sweet cherry and must, therefore, be supplemented by photosynthates from other sources.

Open Access

Fruit mass development in `Crowley', `Pilgrim', and `Stevens' cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) was compared in five states for two seasons. Comparing all locations, `Stevens' and `Pilgrim' cranberries had similar growth curves with a faster growth rate than that of `Crowley'. Regional differences in fruit development were observed. Shorter growing seasons, especially in Wisconsin, were compensated for by more rapid growth rates. Conversely, low initial mass and slower growth rates were compensated for by the longer growing season in the Pacific Northwest. Solar radiation intensity accounted for little of the variability in fruit growth. Neither growing degree days nor numbers of days were good predictors of cranberry fruit fresh mass accumulation. Instead, numbers of moderate temperature days (between 16 and 30 °C) appeared to be key, accounting for greater than 80% of the variability in cranberry fresh biomass accumulation. The most rapid growth rates occurred when temperatures were in this range. High temperatures were limiting in New Jersey while low temperatures were limiting in Oregon and Washington. In one of two seasons, low temperatures were limiting in Wisconsin: accumulation of 0.5 g fresh mass took 11 d longer. Massachusetts had the fewest periods of temperature extremes in both seasons, resulting in the shortest number of days required to accumulate 0.5 g fresh mass.

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