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  • Author or Editor: T. W. Young x
  • HortScience x
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To promote both learning and horticulture, a 5 year pilot program was implemented with a collaborative effort between the Louisiana State University Horticulture Department and the University Laboratory School. The objective of this program was to develop a hands-on approach to learning which fostered self-discovery and a positive perception of horticulture. First graders were able to experiment in both the greenhouse and in the field with instruction in the classroom. Among the many concepts that the children were Introduced to, they benefitted most from being able to participate and observe the process from seeding to harvesting enabling them to work with the different types of seeds, media, and fertilizers. In the classroom, horticulture was Integrated in every subject of the first grade class. For example, the students learned math by measuring and counting the produce then making charts to report their findings. The result of the program was that the children did in fact obtain a positive perspective of horticulture while developing an awareness of the process of growth and development of horticultural crops. The first grade class received a national award for donating their produce to the local food bank in Baton Rouge.

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Abstract

A population of 100 sweet potato seedlings from 7 parent clones was grown for one season in order to evaluate root protein quantity and quality. Protein content of the 100 seedlings ranged from 4.38% to 8.98% with a mean of 6.29%; the 7 parents ranged from 4.96% to 6.53% with a mean of 5.72%. The mean of the seedlings was not significantly different from that of the parents. The 10 seedlings with highest protein (7.40% to 8.98%) were selected for further study of protein quality. Levels of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) in these high protein selections were not significantly different from those of the parents. The correlation between the percentage of protein and the percentage of NPN was low (r = 0.30). The amino acid pattern in the high protein selections differed significantly from the parents with lower levels of valine, cysteine, methionine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) levels in the selected seedlings did not vary significantly from the parents. TIA and the percentage of protein were not significantly correlated (r = 0.15). The results indicate it is possible to obtain high protein cultivars without increasing the percentages of NPN and TIA. With the exception of valine, the aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids, the overall protein quality was not changed in the seedlings with increased protein content.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Majestic’ peach {Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was released by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a large, excellent quality freestone fruit in the ripening sequence between ‘Harvester’ and ‘Red Globe’ or from June 22 to July 1 in north Louisiana (1).

Open Access

Abstract

Shading of nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] scaffold limbs 45-58 days after full bloom caused seed discoloration and fruit abscission. Shading of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] scaffold limbs from 31-41 days after full bloom caused greater fruit adscisson than shading from 11-21 or 21-31 days after bloom. The photosynthetic inhibitor, 3-tert-butyl-5-chloro-6-methyluracil (terbacil), applied to whole trees 35 days after full bloom induced fruit abscission. Terbacil at 500 ppm or higher caused excessive thinning. Fruit size was larger than hand thinned fruit, since overthinning occurred. Fruit color, soluble solids, and firmness of fruit from the 500 ppm treated trees were similar to fruit from hand thinned trees. No leaves abscissed, but marginal chlorosis occurred on less than 30% of the leaves at harvest. Flower bud numbers per cm of terminal length were similar to the hand thinned trees, but much greater than unthinned trees. Residue analysis of fruit at harvest from the 500 ppm terbacil treatment revealed 0.07 ppm in the fruit.

Open Access

Abstract

‘La Festival’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released to provide a yellow flesh cultivar with a good quality fruit requiring 400 to 500 hr chilling. ‘La Festival’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large freestone fruit that ripen about 25 June, or about 20 days before ‘Elberta’ in southern Louisinna

Open Access

Abstract

‘La Pecher’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released to provide a good quality yellow flesh cultivar with a 400 to 500 hr chilling requirement. ‘La Pecher’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large semifreestone fruit that ripen 39 days before ‘Elberta’ or about 6 June in southern Louisiana.

Open Access

Abstract

‘La White’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released to provide a 600-700 hr chilling requirement, low acid, white flesh cultivar adapted to conditions in southeastern Louisiana. ‘La White’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large semi-freestone fruit that ripen 27 days before ‘Elberta’ or about 18 June in southeastern Louisiana.

Open Access