Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Sylvia M. Blankenship x
  • HortTechnology x
Clear All Modify Search

Bananas were held at 18C in all possible combinations of 65%, 75%, or 95% relative humidity (RH) before and after gassing with ethylene. Peel color, fruit firmness, starch loss, compression injury to peel and pulp, and overall peel scarring were measured. Peels were greener and the fruit were slightly firmer when fruit were held in the higher humidity combinations, particularly when the humidity was high after gassing with ethylene. Starch loss was not different among humidity treatments. Overall peel scarring was about twice as severe with 65% RH compared to 95% RH during the ripening phase. Low humidity before ethylene gassing had little effect on overall scarring. There were some instances where humidity had a significant effect on compression injury; high humidity caused less injury, but the effect was inconsistent.

Full access

Several floral and tree preservatives were evaluated to determine their effect on postharvest needle retention of Fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.], an important Christmas tree species. Clorox (sodium hypochlorite) and aspirin (salicylic acid) caused massive needle loss, and three of the six commercial additives increased needle loss significantly, No treatment was better than water alone.

Free access

A starch staining technique using pictures to rate starch disappearance has been developed to determine banana pulp maturity. The disappearance of starch from the pulp shows linear correlation with peel color (r 2 = 0.76) and soluble solids content (r 2 = 0.81). Pulp pH shows a poor correlation with starch disappearance (r 2 = 0.38). Staining banana pulp starch with an iodine solution is a quick and easy method for estimation of pulp maturity.

Full access

Commercial packing lines in Sampson County, N.C., were surveyed during two growing seasons to study handling methods on susceptibility of bell pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L.) to bacterial soft rot (Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora). Samples were taken from two field packers and one packing house in 1991 and from two field packers and four packing houses in 1992. One field packer and one packing house were common to both years. Fruits were either inoculated with bacteria or untreated and stored at 10 or 21C. Damaged fruits were counted and classified as crushed, cut, bruised, abraded, and other injuries. Fruit injury was less dependent on whether the operation was a packing house or a field packing line than on the overall handling practices of the individual grower. In general, packing peppers in packing houses resulted in an increased number of bruises, whereas fruit from field packing lines had more abrasions. More open skin injuries resulted in greater fruit decay. In both years, fruits stored at 10C had less top rot than fruits stored at 21C. In 1992, they also had less pod rot. Dry and chlorinated lines often had equivalent rot problems.

Full access

A series of studies were conducted to better understand the occurrence and causes of internal necrosis (IN) in ‘Covington’ sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Assessment of the problem among the industry was done for 2 years and revealed that IN was widespread in commercial storage facilities throughout the state of North Carolina; both incidence and severity were generally low (<10% incidence with minimal severity of symptoms). A few storage rooms had a high percentage of IN with severe storage root symptoms but results were inconsistent across years and among rooms. Preharvest studies with commercially used insecticides did not induce IN, but the harvest aid ethephon consistently induced IN with an incidence higher than 50%. Internal necrosis symptoms were not detectable at harvest, and earliest consistent incidence was observed 6 days after harvest (DAH) during the curing phase. Symptoms became more prevalent and severe at 30 DAH. However, in commercial storage rooms, no relationship was found between IN incidence and postcuring storage temperature or relative humidity (RH) conditions. Sweetpotato storage roots stored in air-tight barrels and exposed to 100 ppm ethylene after curing showed no relationship between the presence of ethylene gas in storage and incidence of IN. Our results indicate that IN incidence of ‘Covington’ is erratic with no obvious cause among storage rooms and that initiation of IN may occur most frequently during the first week following harvest.

Free access