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  • Author or Editor: S.M. McCarter x
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Abstract

In field tests conducted near Tifton, Georgia, soil fumigation with either a methyl bromide-chloropicrin mixture (67-33%, 480 kg/ha) or metham (748 liters/ha) decreased weed infestation and increased growth and marketable yields of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) transplants, compared with pepper planted consecutively without fumigation. Alternate-year rotation of pepper with rye also reduced weed infestation and increased yield. Weed control accounted for 81% of marketable transplant yield. Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Doidge) Dows. overwintered in pepper debris incorporated fresh or dried. Bacterial spot occurred too erratically to permit any conclusions except that the methyl bromide-chloropicrin fumigation failed to provide any control.

Open Access

Abstract

The Fourth Annual Tomato Transplant Research Workshop was held at the Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia, on December 1, 1966. The 52 participants came from 11 states and the District of Columbia, and represented various areas of research, production (canning industry and transplant growers), extension, regulatory, and administration. The research participants included horticulturists, plant physiologists, geneticists, plant pathologists, nematologists, soil scientists, and agricultural engineers. The main topics discussed during the workshop were disease and nematode control, and management practices needed to facilitate mechanization of the transplant harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

Polyethylene mulched bed widths (28, 56, 84 and 112 cm) with methyl bromide-chloropicrin gas mixture (67-33%, 280 kg/ha) soil fumigation were evaluated in 2 tests for soil pest control and production of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). In 2 other tests, methyl bromide-chloropicrin rates of 0, 70, 140, 210 and 280 kg/ha applied under a 112-cm wide mulched bed were evaluated. Populations of root-knot nematodes, parasitic soil fungi, and root-gall indices decreased with increases in mulched bed width. All fumigation rates resulted in decreased populations of root-knot larvae, Fusarium spp., Pythium spp., Rhizoctonia solani and root-gall indices compared with non-fumigated plots. In greenhouse tests, tomato seedlings emerged and survived best in potted soil from mulched plots with the widest bed and those treated with the highest rate of fumigant. Marketable tomato yields increased linearly with increased bed width in 1 test whereas yields were similar among treatments in the other tests.

Open Access