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  • Author or Editor: S. Roy x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Flowering of brodiaea (Triteleia laxa syn. Brodiaea laxa `Queen Fabiola') did not have an obligate requirement for manipulation of temperature or photoperiod. Vernalization of corms reduced the greenhouse forcing phase but did not alter the number of flowers per inflorescence or scape length. Long photoperiods hastened flowering but decreased flower quality and flowering percentage. Scape length, which was not affected by photoperiod or mother corm size, was increased when plants were grown at night temperatures < 10C. Diameter of the apical meristem in the dormant corm, flowering percentage, and flower quality were not affected by a 10-fold increase in corm size above a critical weight (0.6 g). In contrast, the weight and number of daughter corms were closely correlated with mother corm size. The optimum planting depth for brodiaea corms was 10 cm below the soil surface.

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Exposure of dormant corms of Triteleia laxa `Queen Fabiola' to 20 ppm C2H4 for 7 days promoted flowering of small corms and resulted in increased apical meristem size, early sprouting, early flowering, more flowers per Inflorescence, and increased fresh weight of daughter corms and cormels. The respiration rate of the C&treated corms increased to four to five times that of the controls during the 7-day treatment, declined markedly after termination of the C2H4 treatment, but remained higher than that of the controls. The C2H4 effects were associated with increased growth rate and consequently a greater final size of the apical meristem (determined by scanning electron microscopy). Leaves produced by C2H4-treated corms were wider, longer, and weighed more than those of the controls.

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`Golden Delicious' apples (Malus domestica Borkh) were dipped in either distilled water, methylene chloride, or one of the following surfactants: Brij 30, Tween 20, Tween 80, Tergitol 15-S-9, and Triton X-100. The fruit then were pressure-infiltrated with a 2% solution of CaCl2. Following 4 months storage at 0 °C, fruit were removed and flesh Ca concentration analyzed. The fruit surface was observed using low-temperature scanning electron microscopy, and fruit were rated for surface injury. Brij 30 altered the epicuticular wax the least and resulted in the smallest increase in flesh Ca concentration and the softest fruit. Triton X-100 altered the epicuticular wax the most and resulted in the highest fruit flesh Ca concentration and firmest of the surfactant-pretreated fruit. Methylene chloride removed some of the epicuticular wax, and fruit pretreated with this solvent had the highest flesh Ca concentration and greatest firmness. However, all of the fruit treated with methylene chloride were severely injured.

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