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  • Author or Editor: Ruth Ben-Arie x
  • HortScience x
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The commercial storage life of the nonastringent Japanese `Fuyu' persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.), grown in Israel, was extended from 6 to 18 weeks at 0C by modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP) in a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film. MAP retarded fruit softening and inhibited development of peel and flesh disorders, which limited the storage life of the naked fruit. The fruit maintained its external and internal quality within the MAP during a subsequent week at 20C in the 0.08-mm LDPE film. Fruit quality deteriorated more rapidly in a 0.06-mm package. The difference between fruit quality in the two packs is attributed to specific physiological effects of the different atmospheric equilibria established due to film thickness.

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Abstract

Two orchard sprays with 800 ppm methyl l-(butylcarbamoyl)-2-benzimidazole-carbamate (benomyl) or three orchard sprays with 300 ppm 2-(4-thiazolyl) benzimidazole (thiabendazole or TBZ) achieved significant control of storage decay of ‘Spadona’ pears (Pyrus communis L.). Almost complete control of storage decay required postharvest dip-treatments of 1000 ppm benomyl or 500 ppm TBZ. Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea (Pers. ex Fr.) were inhibited by these treatments but Alternaria tenuis (Nees ex Cda.) was unaffected and its incidence increased during storage, possibly due to control of the other organisms. These benzimidazole treatments tended to increase the incidence of internal breakdown of treated pears during prolonged regular cold storage.

Open Access

Abstract

Various combinations of preharvest ethephon sprays were applied to ‘Granny Smith’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh). The fruit were harvested twice the first year with selective picking from the interior and exterior of the tree and three times the second year. Scald incidence was measured after storage at 0°C in air for 3 or 6 months plus 1 week at 20°. There was a correlation between scald after storage and fruit soluble solids concentration and firmness at harvest and with conjugated triene levels at harvest or after storage. Ethephon sprays reduced scald incidence between 20% to 75% depending on treatment and storage length.

Open Access

Mature-green `Anna' apples (Malus domestics Borkh.) reddened after harvest as a result of exposure to continuous cool-white fluorescent light. Color development was most rapid at 20C but most intense at 13C. At 2C, although the induction of red pigmentation was the slowest, a 72-hr exposure rendered color not significantly different from that of red, commercially harvested fruit. The development of color was light-intensity dependent, approaching saturation at 14.5 W·m-2 (at 13 C). No differences in fruit ripening were found between fruit that developed color under artificial light and red fruit from the commercial harvest, in spite of some stimulation of ethylene production during illumination.

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A prestorage heat treatment of 38C for 4 days applied to `Granny Smith' apples (Malus domestics Borkh.) before regular air storage at 0C inhibited the development of superficial scald. Heat-treated apples stored for 3 months had superficial scald levels similar to diphenylamine (DPA)-dipped apples, while all nontreated control apples had scald. After 5 or 6 months of storage, this inhibition of scald development by prestorage heat treatment declined. The prestorage heat treatment inhibited the accumulation of α-farnesene and conjugated trienes in apple cuticle during storage, while DPA inhibited only α-farnesene oxidation. This treatment may be a substitute for chemical treatments against scald not only for short-term storage of `Granny Smith' but possibly also for other scald-susceptible apple cultivars.

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