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  • Author or Editor: Robert L. Geneve x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Seed dormancy in Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis var. canadensis L.) can be overcome by seedcoat scarification to allow water imbibition, followed by chilling stratification to permit germination. During chilling stratification, there was an increase in the growth potential of the embryo as indicated by the ability of the isolated embryo to germinate in osmotic solutions. Penetration resistance of the testa also decreased after chilling stratification. The combination of seedcoat alteration and the increase in embryonic growth potential was associated with overcoming dormancy in redbud seed. GA3 or ethephon (50 μm) stimulated germination (28% and 60%, respectively) and increased the growth potential of treated embryos. Chemical names used: gibberellic acid (GA3), (2-chloroethyl) phosphoric acid (ethephon).

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The seedcoat anatomy in the hilar region was examined in dry, imbibed and germinating seeds of Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis L.). A discontinuous area was observed between macrosclereid cells in the palisade layer of the seedcoat which formed a hilar slit. A cap was formed during germination as the seedcoat separated along the hilar slit and was hinged by the macrosclereids in the area of the seedcoat opposite to the hilar slit. The discontinuity observed in the palisade layer was the remnant of the area traversed by the vascular trace between the funiculus and the seedcoat of the developing ovule. There were no apparent anatomical differences in the hilar region of the seedcoat between dormant and nondormant imbibed seeds. However, the thickened mesophyll of the seedcoat in this region and the capacity of the endosperm to stretch along with the elongating radicle may contribute to maintaining dormancy in redbud seeds.

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Abstract

Adventitious root initiation decreased in ‘Berken’ mung bean cuttings treated with ≥ 10−4 m (2-chloroethyl) phosphonic acid (ethephon). Ethephon at 10−3 but not 10−5 m reduced root length and caused a redistribution of roots along the hypocotyl. The application of ethephon in combination with indoleacetic acid (IAA), indolebutyric acid (IBA), naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) reduced root initiation. An initial treatment of ethephon followed by NAA, or NAA followed by ethephon, inhibited root initiation to the same degree. Ethephon—whether applied at the time of cutting preparation or up to 12 hours later—inhibited root initiation to the same extent.

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Abstract

Ethylene liberated from control and auxin-treated cuttings of Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilcz cv. Berken was monitored for 14 hours. For root initiation, naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and indolebutyric acid (IBA) were the most effective with indoleacetic acid (IAA) intermediate and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic (2,4-D) the least effective. No correlation was observed between the quantity of auxin-induced ethylene evolved and the number of roots formed. Decreasing the NAA solution pH from 7.0 to 3.0 reduced the evolution of ethylene but did not alter the rooting response of the cuttings. It was concluded that stimulation of adventitious root initiation by auxin is not mediated by ethylene.

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Exogenous ethylene could not substitute for NAA to induce adventitious root initiation in juvenile petiole explants of English ivy (Hedera helix L.), indicating that the action of auxin-stimulated root initiation was not directly mediated through ethylene production. Mature petioles did not initiate roots under any auxin or ethylene treatment combination. Ethephon or ACC supplied at 50 or 100 μm was inhibitory to NAA-induced root initiation in juvenile petioles. The pattern of ethylene production stimulated by NAA application was significantly different in juvenile and mature petioles. Ethylene evolution by juvenile petioles declined to near control levels during from 6 to 12 days after NAA application. Reduction in ethylene production was due to reduced availability of ACC in juvenile petioles. Mature petioles continued to produce ethylene at elevated levels throughout the course of the experiment. Ethylene does not appear to play a significant role in the differential root initiation response of juvenile and mature petioles treated with NAA. However, ethylene appeared to have an inhibitory effect during root elongation stages of adventitious root development in juvenile petioles. Chemical names used: 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC); 1-napthaleneacetic acid (NAA); 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (ethephon).

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Several inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and action, as well as an atmospheric ethylene scrubber, were used to investigate the role of ethylene in adventitious root initiation in de-bladed petioles from the juvenile and mature phase of English ivy (Hedera helix L.). Induction of root primordia required NAA regardless of the inhibitor treatment. Difficult-to-root mature petioles have been shown to produce higher amounts of ethylene than easy-to-root juvenile petioles. However, mature petioles failed to root under any combination of NAA and inhibitor treatment, indicating that the continued evolution of ethylene in NAA-treated mature petioles was not responsible for the absence of a rooting response. Root initiation in juvenile petioles was not affected by treatment with the ethylene action inhibitors STS and NDE, nor by removal of atmospheric ethylene with KMnO. Inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis using AVG or AOA reduced root initiation in juvenile petioles, but this response was not well-correlated to the observed reduction in ethylene evolution. The inhibitory action of AVG could not be reversed by the addition of ethylene gas or ACC, which indicated that AVG could be acting through a mechanism other than the inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis. Chemical names used: 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA); l-aminocyclopropane-l-carboxylic acid (ACC); silver thiosulfate (STS); 2,5-norbornadiene (NDE); aminoethyoxyvinyl-glycine (AVG); aminooxyacetic acid (AOA).

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Sweet corn (Zea mays L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds were aged naturally for 18 months or artificially aged using saturated salt accelerated aging to provide seed lots that differed in seed vigor, but retained a high standard germination percentage. Seed vigor was confirmed using standard vigor tests, including time to radicle emergence, cold, and accelerated aging tests. Ethylene evolution from both sweet corn and tomato seeds during germination was positively correlated with seed quality. Differences in ethylene evolution between nonaged and aged seeds were greater in seeds germinated on exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). After 36 hours, there was about a 15-fold increase in ethylene evolution from seeds treated with 5 mm ACC compared to untreated seeds. Naturally and artificially aged seeds responded similarly and showed reduced ethylene production compared to nonaged seeds. In contrast to ethylene production, endogenous ACC titers were less for nonaged compared to aged seeds. Exogenous application of ACC to artificially aged seeds reduced the time to radicle protrusion, but did not completely reverse age-related effects on vigor. The data indicate that the reduced ability to produce ethylene in aged seeds was related to ACC oxidase (ACCO) synthesis or activity. Using Northern blot analysis, ACCO mRNA was detected after 48 hours of imbibition in nonaged seeds, but was undetectable in aged seeds affirming the contention that ACCO synthesis was delayed or reduced by aging. The current study provides additional support for ethylene as a biochemical indicator of seed vigor in seed lots with reduced vigor but high germination capacity.

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Abstract

An in vitro system has been developed to study adventitious root initiation in the juvenile and mature phases of English ivy (Hedera helix L.). The system uses de-bladed petiole explants cultured in a defined liquid medium. Adventitious roots are visible macroscopically after 18 days. Juvenile petiole explants show a dose-response to auxin application with optimal root initiation at 100 μM NAA or IAA. With optimal auxin concentration, root initials form in juvenile petiole explants directly from cortical parenchyma cells, which involves induction (1–6 days), meristem organization (6–9 days), and root elongation stages (9–18 days). Sucrose is required for outgrowth of root primordia but not for initiation of primordia. Mature petiole explants respond to auxin with random cell divisions in cortical parenchyma cells; root initials form at a low frequency from callus resulting from this cortical cell division. Distribution of 14C at various times after administration of 14C-labeled NAA is similar in juvenile and mature petioles. Because of their difference in rooting potential, coupled with similarity in anatomical organization, distribution of 14C from NAA, and identical genotype, juvenile and mature petioles provide an excellent experimental system for analyzing the morphogenetic, physiological, and genetic basis of rooting potential. Chemical names used: 1-napthaleneacetic acid (NAA); 1H-indoIe-3-acetic acid (IAA).

Open Access

Rooting stage, transpiration capacity, and relative water content were measured in cuttings every 5 days for 25 days. Cell divisions in phloem parenchyma were evident between 5 and 10 days after sticking, organized subcuticular root primordia were present between 10 and 12 days, and roots emerged between 12 and 15 days. Transpiration was measured in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch `Freedom Dark Red') cuttings under light or dark conditions at increasing vapor pressure deficit (VPDair) levels during different stages of rooting. Transpiration capacity did not increase until roots emerged on the cuttings. Light had a significant impact on transpiration rates only after roots emerged. Light was more significant than VPDair for determining actual transpiration. Between visible rooting (15 days) and 25 days, increase in total root length was linear (r 2 = 0.92) and significantly correlated with transpiration (r 2 = 0.98). Transpiration capacity increased after visible rooting, but did not significantly increase under non-misted conditions until cuttings were well-rooted and had a total root length >50 cm (18 days after sticking). Relative water content measured before and after entering the transpiration chamber confirmed that cuttings were only able to take enough water from the medium to continue sustained transpiration after 18 days. A cutting coefficient was developed from transpiration data to modify the misting interval for dynamic controlled misting. Greenhouse studies showed a 55% or greater reduction in water use with dynamic control compared to constant static or stepped down static control. Rooting performance was unaffected by misting interval. Foliar nutrition was significantly reduced in all cuttings after 7 days in the mist bench, but changes in foliar elemental content were not correlated with misting interval.

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Root zone temperature optima for root initiation and root elongation stages for rooting in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch `Freedom Dark Red') cuttings was determined to be 28 and 26 °C, respectively. Threshold temperatures where rooting development was slow (>24 days) or did not occur were ≤20 and ≥32 °C. Time to visible rooting and postemergent root elongation was modeled based on cumulative daily mean root zone temperatures in growth chamber studies using a thermogradient table to provide simultaneous temperatures between 19 to 34 °C. Time to root emergence at different root zone temperatures was best described using a nonlinear growth rate derived mathematical model, while postemergent root elongation up to 100 cm could be described using either a linear thermal time model or a nonlinear equation based on elongation rate. These temperature-based mathematical models were used to predict rooting in six greenhouse experiments. Using a root zone base temperature of 21 °C, observed vs. predicted time to visible root emergence was highly correlated (r 2 = 0.98) with a mean prediction error (MPE) of 1.6 d. Observed vs. predicted root length using the linear thermal time model had a r 2 = 0.69 and an MPE of 14.6 cm, which was comparable to the nonlinear model with an r 2 = 0.82 and an MPE of 14.8 cm.

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