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  • Author or Editor: Richard Smith* x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) cv. Redcoat were stored at several temperatures and for various intervals in controlled atmospheres (CA) containing 0% to 18% CO2 and 15% to 21% 02. Bioyield point forces recorded on the CA-stored fresh fruit indicated that the addition of CO2 to the storage environment enhanced fruit firmness. Fruit kept under 15% CO2 for 18 hours was 48% firmer than untreated samples were initially. Response to increasing CO2 concentrations was linear. There was no response to changing 02 concentrations. Maximum enhancement of firmness was achieved at a fruit temperature of 0C; there was essentially no enhancement at 21C. In some instances, there was a moderate firmness enhancement as time in storage increased. Carbon dioxide acted to reduce the quantity of fruit lost due to rot. Fruit that was soft and bruised after harvest became drier and firmer in a CO2-enriched environment.

Free access

Abstract

Multiple linear regression analysis was used to develop commercial harvest prediction dates for peach ‘Earlired’, ‘Redhaven’, and ‘Loring’. Prediction equations were developed using degree day summations and date of full bloom as variables. These equations were adjusted for geographic microclimatic variation and tested in 6 commercial peach orchards over 4 years. Predicted dates and actual first commercial harvest dates differed by 4 days or less for 100%, 96%, and 84% of the predictions for ‘Earlired’, ‘Redhaven’, and ‘Loring’, respectively.

Open Access

Abstract

Total weight loss of < 10% over a 10-week period was achieved by storing celery in atmospheres containing 1% O2 combined with 2% or 4% CO2 at 0°C. Significant increases in marketable celery resulted when C2H4 was scrubbed from some atmospheres. A combination of 1% or 2% O2 and 2% or 4% CO2 prevented black stem development during the storage period. Improved visual color, appearance, flavor, and increased marketable celery justifies the use of 4% CO2 in celery storages.

Open Access

Abstract

A mathematical analysis of optimum locations for frozen green pea processing was conducted. Inputs to the model included: raw product costs, procurement costs, economies of scale in freezing and freezer storage, labor costs, fuel and electrical costs, state, local and federal taxes, length of the pea processing season, length of the total processing season, weighted regional consumption by state, and transportation costs to market centers (states). Analytical procedures used Stollsteimer’s method for number and sizes of plants combined with a transhipment model to compare regions.

The results suggest that the numbers of processing plants within an area are significantly less important than cost differentials between areas. The models developed were sensitive to changes in many costs – raw product costs, wage rates, length of season, allocation of overhead, freight costs, and in some states, state and local taxes.

The optimum solution called for a few large plants in each of the Eastern, Midwestern and Western regions. The Washington-Oregon-Idaho complex would predominate with approximately 59 percent of total production, followed by Maryland-Delaware with 14 percent and Wisconsin with 10 percent.

Open Access