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  • Author or Editor: R. F. Carlson x
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Abstract

Eleven apple clones and a seedling source of Red Delicious (Malus sylvestris Mill.) were grown in one-gallon containers in the greenhouse to evaluate growth responses to soil water. All clones and seedlings were nongrafted and these are listed in Table 1.

Open Access

Abstract

The North Central Regional Committee “Stock Scion Relationships in Horticultural Plants” (NC 78) undertook, in 1966-67, a survey of rootstock production of deciduous fruits. The committee representative from each state ! contacted the nurserymen of his own state1. These data have been compiled for the purpose of implementing and coordinating future research concerning the problems of stock-scion relationships such as incompatibilities and failure of anticipated tree and fruit responses under different climatic and environmental conditions.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Mark is a new dwarfing, vegetatively propagated apple rootstock now released for commercial use. The stature of trees on Mark is similar to that on M 26, or about 50% compared to seedling stock (1, 2). It produces a strong root system, providing freestanding trees of ‘Red Prince Delicious’, now in their 15th year. With the same nonspur cultivar, Mark has demonstrated precocity similar to that of M 9. In a NC-140 rootstock trial at East Lansing, ‘Starkspur Supreme Delicious’/Mark, planted in 1980, has been superior to date in blossom production as compared to 7 other rootstocks (Table 1). Other NC-140 trials in several states and Canada have shown similar trends in blossom and fruit production (6).

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Sweet cherries (Prunus avium L.) budded on Mahaleb (P. mahaleb L.) in some instances exhibit incompatibility symptoms, but less frequently when on Mazzard rootstock (4). The symptoms of incompatibility of sweet cherry cultivars on Mahaleb are over-growth above the graft union and premature defoliation in the fall. Longitudinal sections through the graft union reveal a thick phloem and bark just above the graft union, whereas, no major abnormalities appear in the xylem area of the graft union (4).

Open Access

Abstract

Injections of 10 ppm of gibberellic acid (GA3) had increasing effects on terminal shoot growth of ‘Red Prince Delicious’ apple as rootstock vigor decreased. Injections of 100 ppm of abscisic acid (ABA) caused all trees to cease growth and to form terminal buds characteristic of summer dormancy. The most dwarfing trees responded more quickly to ABA than did the more vigorous trees.

Open Access

Abstract

Seedlings of Mazzard (Prunus avium L.) and Mahaleb (P. mahaleb L.) cherries were found to differ in phenolic and coumarin components in the leaf, stem and root Analysis by gas liquid chromatography indicated more o-coumaric acid in the leaves than in stem and roots. Bark of Mahaleb stem and roots contained coumarin and herniarin. The difference in phenolic composition in these cherry seedlings may play a role in scion overgrowth when sweet cherry cultivars are budded on Mahaleb stocks.

Open Access

Two heavily-cropping, twelve-year-old prune trees (Prunus domestica L., syn. `Prune d'Agen') were compared with two adjacent trees which were defruited during stage II of fruit growth (28 May). Trees were uprooted, dissected, and processed to determine total nonstructural carbohydrates, tree nutrient contents and within-tree distribution at the time of fruit maturity (28 July). Trees defruited 2 months earlier contained 5 times as much starch and 2.5 times as much total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) in leaves and perennial tree parts as did cropping trees at the time of fruit maturity.

Cropping trees absorbed about 90 g more K during stage III of fruit growth than did defruited trees during the same interval (28 May -28 July). Vegetative trees parts (i.e., trunk, branches, roots, and leaves) in cropping trees generally had lower K contents than did defruited trees at the time of fruit maturity. Fruit demand for K was associated with increased K uptake from the soil despite reduced levels of TNC in the roots and the probability of reduced root growth. Potassium uptake by heavily cropping trees was not resource limited when K was supplied regularly through the drip irrigation system.

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