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  • Author or Editor: R. E. Gough x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

The root system of the cultivated highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is primarily composed of fine, thread-like roots less than 1 mm in diameter. Essentially all of the roots of 7-year-old ‘Lateblue’ bushes were located within the area between the crown and the dripline. Most of the roots on 13-year-old ‘Coville’ bushes were also within this area. Roots were found 180 cm from the crown and at depths of 81 cm. Roots were in the decomposing low layers of the sawdust mulch but not within the upper, non-decomposing layers.

Open Access
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Abstract

Stone cells of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) were distributed primarily toward the periphery of the fruit; they apparently differentiated from ground parenchyma shortly after anthesis. Secondary cell wall material continued to be accreted through harvest, with lamellations about 1μm in width. The lignified walls were heavily pitted, with pits contiguous with those of adjacent stone cells. The number of stone cells may be correlated positively to the length of the growth season for each cultivar.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Berry/pedicel abscission zone formation in cultivated highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) during fruit ripening appeared at the distal portion of the transition zone (disc) separating the berry and the pedicel. The abscission zone was first evident as a compressed zone of cells at the periphery of the berry/pedicel junction in the immature green stage of berry development. Cell separation initially appeared during the green-pink berry stage concomitant with berry coloration. Separation was characterized primarily by cell wall rupture. No separation layer was formed through either the berry epidermis or the vascular bundles. The number of berries without attached pedicels separating from the cluster under applied force was closely related to the stage of ripening of the fruit. Stresses imparted during ripening by rupturing internal tissues are evident in definite morphological changes appearing on the surface of the fruit.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Flooded, 2-year-old highbush blueberry plants (Vaccinium corymbosum L. ‘Bluecrop’) survived 30 months of continuous flooding, but vegetative growth was suppressed after ≈4 months. Plants continuously flooded for 4 months and subsequently placed in the field recovered partially. The greatest number of plants died when flooding began in April and the least number when it was begun in December.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Annual growth of white unsuberized roots from mature ‘Earliblue’, ‘Bluecrop’, and ‘Lateblue’ blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) plants relative to soil temperatures, shoot growth, and stage of development was studied for 3 years. The growth of roots continued throughout the year, but was much reduced at soil temperatures below 8°C. Two peaks in the growth of roots occurred, the first in early June and the 2nd, higher peak in September. Both peaks in root growth occurred with soil temperatures of 14° to 18°. The growth rate declined at soil temperatures outside this range. Growth of roots was concomitant with shoot growth.

Open Access

Abstract

The seasonal vegetative growth sequences of the highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum Ait.) and certain features, including apical abortion, are described during growth under usual conditions and under the influence of succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (daminozide) sprays. Apical abortion, followed by chlorosis and necrosis of the distal portion of the shoot is a natural phenomenon in highbugh blueberry and results in episodic, sympodial extension growth. Daminozide sprays did not substantially alter the abortion pattern, though shoot growth was substantially reduced the first year of spray application. Shoot growth was not significantly reduced in bushes sprayed but not pruned for 2 years.

Open Access

Abstract

Flower bud ontogeny was similar in plants of high bush blueberry (Viccinium corymbosum Ait.) grown under normal conditions and under treatment with 5000 ppm succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (daminozide) sprays.

Open Access