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  • Author or Editor: R. E. Gomez x
  • HortScience x
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Agricultural databases have existed in one form or another from time immemorial. However, their usefulness to horticulturists has not been the greatest. Many databases exist today that one can use to research developments in agriculture. However, none exists that allow a horticulturist to rapidly focus on a subject with the assurance that the information is accurate. Accuracy of information, especially that which can readily be used by Extension horticulture specialists and agents, is not guaranteed. The Cooperative Extension System (CES) through several state specialist and the National Program Leader at USDA developed a list of current and available Extension literature on three distinct subjects during the early 1980s. These lists were compiled by the Specialists and were placed in an electronic format (bulletin board) available through the nascent CES electronic network. This effort was abandoned 3 years after inception due to lack of use by CES staff. One of the reasons for not using these lists so as not to reinvent the wheel was that electronic communication at that time was very expensive. Other reasons were that it was cumbersome and did not include text. There was no quality assurance of any kind. In the case of this primitive database in horticulture, personal contacts were much more useful and convenient. Indeed there are many databases that have horticultural subjects included and many more are being created. These are only marginally useful to us in horticulture. There is a shining nova in our horizon today. HortBase offers the best chance we in horticulture, and especially in Extension horticulture programs, have of being able to use data (written and hopefully in other media) that meet our specific requirements. HortBase will be a peer-reviewed accumulation of our experiences and experiments whether in the classroom or in the field. It has a great potential to become one of our best tools for program development and delivery. We in horticulture, whether at the society, national, state, region, or county level, must help in the development and maintenance of this rising star so that it truly reaches its full potential.

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Abstract

Two jicama (Pachyrrhizus erosus Urban) or yam bean cultivars were grown for 0, 30, or 65 days of natural daylength prior to placement under short days (9-hour natural light, 0800 to 1700 hours) and long days (short day plus 87 watts/m2 incandescent light, from 2200 to 0200 hours). After 10 weeks, fleshy root growth was more rapid and extensive under short days for both cultivars in all pretreatment exposures. After 20 weeks, the relative differences in root dry weight were greater for 0- and 30-day pretreatment and in ‘Cristalina’ than in ‘Agua Dulce’.

Open Access

Abstract

Basal pruning of piñon pine (Pinus edulis Engelm.) stems to a 1.5 m. height markedly increased nut size and percent full nuts but not percent kernel (weight of kernel/weight of nut × 100).

Open Access

Abstract

Rapid proliferation of axillary buds of ‘Thornless Boysenberry’ and ‘Thornless Young-berry’ (Rubus sp.) in tissue culture has been achieved on a modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 6-benzylamino purine (BA) and α-napthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Shoots were induced to root on medium consisting of MS high mineral salts, myo-inositol, and thia-mine·HCl diluted to 1/16 to 1/2 strength and supplemented with full strength sucrose and agar. Rooted plants have been successfully moved to soil and grown in the greenhouse.

Open Access