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  • Author or Editor: R. A. Reinert x
  • HortScience x
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Abstract

Twelve cultivars of Elatior begonia (Begonia X hiemalis Fotsch.) were exposed to O3 at 25 and 50 pphm. The ‘Schwabenland’ group, ‘Whisper ‘O’ Pink’, and ‘Improved Krefeld Orange’ were the most sensitive, whereas ‘Ballerina’, ‘Mikkell Limelight’, and ‘Turo’ were the least sensitive. ‘Rennaisance’, ‘Heirloom’ ‘Nixe’, and ‘Fantasy’ were intermediate in sensitivity. The dry weight of foliage (stems plus leaves) of 9 cultivars exposed to O3 was significantly less than that of control plants. Ozone at 25 and 50 pphm inhibited flower growth (including peduncles) and development in 4 and 8 of the 12 cultivars, respectively. Differences in flower weight ranged from 43 to 105% of the control at 25 pphm and from 25 to 98% of the control at 50 pphm, depending on cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

A single 4 hour exposure of shore juniper, Juniperus conferta Parl., to 0.3 ppm O3, alone or in combination with 0.15 ppm nitrogen dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide, produced a significant number of small (<3 mm), elongate, tan foliar lesions 2 to 4 days after exposure. The injury symptoms were not identical to those associated with shore juniper decline.

Open Access

Abstract

Foliage of field-grown muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Ser.) is susceptible to injury induced by ambient concentrations of ozone. Foliar injury symptoms consisted of interveinal chlorosis of the adaxial surface of the leaf tissue followed by bleaching of the foliage and necrosis. Fully mature leaves were affected more than younger leaves. Controlled fumigations of muskmelon plants with known concentrations of ozone produced foliar symptoms identical to those observed in the field. A differential cultivar response to ozone is reported and potentially tolerant genotypes are identified.

Open Access

Abstract

Foliage of watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai] is susceptible to injury induced by ambient concentrations of ozone. Injury symptoms consisted of a premature chlorotic mottle of leaf tissue, followed by stippling and bleaching of the foliage, and necrosis. Older, more mature leaves were more affected than younger leaves. There was a differential cultivar response to ozone, which identified potential insensitive genotypes.

Open Access

Abstract

Ozone (O3) is the most damaging air pollutant affecting agricultural crops in the United States and bean is one of the most O3-sensitive crop species. More than 2000 plant introductions of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were evaluated for sensitivity to O3 by exposing bean plants to 0.6 ppm O3 for 2 hours under controlled environmental conditions; 54 insensitive and 67 highly sensitive plant introductions were identified based on foliar injury symptoms.

Open Access