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  • Author or Editor: P. C. Collins x
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Abstract

Ficus benjamina was stored in the dark for 0, 3, 6, 9, or 12 days and then held in a simulated interior environment (SIE) for 12 weeks under 6, 12, or 24 hours/day light duration of either incandescent (INC) or Cool White fluorescent (CWF) lamps at 20 μE m−2s−1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Leaf drop was less and plant grade was higher with shorter dark storage periods. Plants lighted for 24 hours/day had less leaf drop and better plant grade than those lighted for shorter durations. Chlorophyll content was greater as light duration increased for plants held under CWF lamps. Plants lighted for 6 hr/day under INC lamps had the lowest chlorophyll content after 12 weeks in the SIE.

Open Access

Abstract

Ficus benjamina was held in light-and-temperature-controlled chambers for 12 weeks under 3 light sources of 20 μE m−2s−1 incandescent (INC) lamps, 20 μE m−2s−1 Cool White fluorescent (CWF) lamps, or 10 μE m−2s−1 INC + 10 μE m−2s−1 CWF light combination totaling 20 μE m−2s−1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Plants also received 4 light durations (6, 12, 18, or 24 hr/day). Growth index was greater for plants held under INC. When plants were held under the light combination, leaf drop was reduced and plant grade was improved. Dry weight and plant grade increased and leaf drop decreased when plants were lighted for 24 hr/day. Chlorophyll content decreased under the light sources in the following order: CWF> light combination >INC.

Open Access

Abstract

Ficus benjamina L. was dark-stored for 4, 8, or 12 days at 3°, 7°, 21°, 35° or 39°C, and then held indoors for 30 days. Plants received no damage when stored at 21° or 35° or when stored for 4 days at any temperature treatment. Leaf loss and foliar damage were more severe and dry weight, chlorophyll content, and plant grade were reduced as exposure time increased from 4 to 12 days. Plants exposed to 21° or 35° had less leaf loss and no foliar damage and greater dry weight, chlorophyll content, and plant grade than plants exposed to 3°, 7°, or 39°. Chlorophyll content was least in plants exposed to 39°.

Open Access

Abstract

F. benjamina L. were produced in a greenhouse shaded to provide a maximum natural light level of 400 or 800 μmol s-1m-2 photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) for 5 months. Plants were held indoors for 12 weeks under incandescent (INC) or cool-white fluorescent (CWF) lamps at 10 μmol s-1m-2 or 20 μmol s-1m-2 for 12 hr/day. Leaf drop was substantially reduced and plant quality was increased when plants were produced under 800 μmol s-1m-2 or when plants were held indoors under 20 μmol s-1m-2 of light. Leaf loss in response to production light levels, postproduction light levels, and light source was different when measured over time. Dry weight was increased when plants were produced under 800 μmol s-1m-2. Chlorophyll content was increased in plants grown under 400 μmol s-1m-2 or held under CWF lamps.

Open Access

Increased peroxidase activity is used to predict development of off-flavor in frozen sweet corn. However, peroxidase activity was not indicative of flavor changes in frozen supersweet (sh2) or sugar enhanced (sul/se) sweet corn genotypes. These results suggested an inactivation or absence of certain peroxidase isozymes. Frozen `Florida Staysweet' (sh2), `Merit' (sul), and `Bodacious' (sul/se) kernels were cut from cobs after 0 and 12 months of storage. Proteins extracted from acetone powders were separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) and Native-PAGE. Banding patterns differed according to cultivar and storage duration. All cultivars contained a peroxidase isozyme having a molecular weight of 99 kD and pI of 4.5. The sul/se and su2 cultivars expressed an additional peroxidase band of 17.9 kD. An additional peroxidase isozyme (pI 5.0) appeared after 12 months of storage in the sul cultivar. This isozyme did not appear in sul/se or sh2 and is a possible marker for predicting off-flavor in corn. This isozyme may also catalyze off-flavor reactions in sul corn genotypes. Although changes in total peroxidase activity may not predict flavor loss in all genotypes, certain peroxidase isozymes may be useful in predicting and catalyzing off-flavor reactions in sul corn cultivars.

Free access

Combinations of solarized soil (SBS), bare soil control (BS), black plastic mulched soil (BM), row cover (RC), fungicide (chlorothalonil) and biological treatments (Bacillus cereus) were evaluated. SBS vs. BS treatments were main plots, mulch and row covers splitplots and foliage treatments split-splitplots. Application of either foliar treatment was superior to BS. Using a 1/2 rate of fungicide on plants from solarized soil treatments showed equal or comparable reduction of the disease when compared to tomatoes grown in BS with high rates of the fungicide. Combined treatments of solarized + BM, BM with or without RC and low rate of fungicide or biological agent, were the most effective when compared to BS + fungicide, indicating that integration of plasticulture and biological strategies can reduce early blight below the levels of commercial fungicide applied to tomatoes grown on BS.

Free access