Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • Author or Editor: P. C. Andersen x
  • HortScience x
Clear All Modify Search

Fruit characteristics of Oriental persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) [`Fuyu' (Expts. 1 and 2) and `Tanenashi' (Expt. 3)] were assessed as a function of five pollination treatments: 1) hand-pollination (HP) with `Gailey' pollen (G); 2) HP with `Nishimura Wase' pollen (NW); 3) HP with `Turkeytown' pollen (T) (not used for `Tanenashi'); 4) open-pollination (OP), which did not necessarily result in pollination; and 5) nonpollination (NP) where pollination was prevented by covering the flower. Final fruit set of `Fuyu' and `Tanenashi' was higher for G and NW pollen than for NP. Differences in fruit set among the remaining treatments depended on the particular experiment. For example, fruit set for OP was higher than for NP in Expts. 1 and 3 but not Expt. 2. Fruit weight and soluble solids concentration (SSC) of `Fuyu' were not affected by treatment in Expts. 1 and 2; however, in Expt. 2, fruit height and diameter of G, NW, T, or OP were larger than for NP. Seed count per fruit was inversely related to fruit development period but did not influence fruit size or SSC. Fruit height, diameter, weight, and total soluble solids of `Tanenashi' for G, NW, and OP exceeded those for NP, although rarely were seeds present.

Free access

Abstract

The 1st year performance of ‘Vidal Blanc’ and ‘Chancellor’ European-American grape cultivars was evaluated in a drought year. The most favorable treatment on plant water relations and vine growth was soil profile modification with irrigation (MI), followed by no soil profile modification with irrigation (Cl), soil profile modification without irrigation (MN), and no soil profile modification without irrigation (CN). Leaf conductance (kl), transpiration, vine height, leaf number, average leaf area, and total estimated leaf area were increased 2 to 7 times with irrigation. ‘Vidal Blanc’ seems to be better adapted than ‘Chancellor’ to low soil moisture conditions. Irrigation was consistently more beneficial than soil profile modification in the establishment year.

Open Access

Abstract

Paclobutrazol was applied 30 Mar. 1984 as a soil drench to 3rd-leaf pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] ‘Cheyenne’ at concentrations between 0.05 to 2.60 g a.i./cm2 trunk cross-sectional area. Paclobutrazol inhibited tree growth, shoot extension, and trunk and limb growth during 1984 and 1985. Relative water content of leaflets was positively related and leaflet area was negatively related to paclobutrazol concentration. Paclobutrazol promoted lateral branching on a unit length basis on 1983 wood, although no significant relationship was apparent on 1984 wood. Leaflet weight under stress and turgid conditions was reduced with increasing paclobutrazol concentration. Net CO2 assimilation rate, leaf conductance, transpiration rate, leaf chlorophyll, and kernal weight measured during 1985 were not affected by paclobutrazol. The effects of soil-applied paclobutrazol under field conditions persist at least 3 years. Chemical name used: P-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

Open Access

Abstract

Some aspects of senescence and bud hardiness of young ‘Vidal blanc’ and ‘Chancellor’ French-American grapevines in the following treatments were evaluated: soil profile modification plus irrigation (MI), no soil profile modification plus irrigation (Cl), soil profile modification without irrigation (MN), and no soil profile modification without irrigation (CN). After a prolonged summer drought, abundant fall precipitation increased 25 Oct. chlorophyll and leaf N levels for nonirrigated vines. In contrast, leaf P and K were higher for irrigated treatments. Bud hardiness of ‘Chancellor’ was greater than ‘Vidal blanc’ for all except the Cl treatment. Maximum primary bud hardiness was achieved in the Cl and MN treatment for ‘Vidal blanc’ and ‘Chancellor’, respectively. Cambium damage and/or plant death occurred for only ‘Vidal blanc’ in the CN treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

The effects of root anaerobiosis on root respiration and leaf conductance (kl) were determined in solution culture experiments. Respiration of feeder roots (<2 mm diameter) in air (21% O2) of Pyrus betulaefolia Bunge, Pyrus calleryana Decne, Pyrus communis L. (‘Old Home’ × ‘Farmingdale 97’) and Cydonia oblonga Mill. ‘Provence BA 29’ was reduced by no more than 50% after 21 days of anaerobiosis. In contrast, root respiration of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch ‘Lovell’ was reduced by 80% with anaerobiosis, whereas that of Salix discolor Muhl. increased. Reductions in kl with anaerobiosis generally were more pronounced than reduction in root respiration when measured in air. Respiration rates of aerobically or anaerobically treated pear roots were inhibited by 25% to 50% when incubated in 0.5% O2 compared to rates in air. More work is required in order to delineate the relationship of root respiration and kl with anaerobiosis.

Open Access