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  • Author or Editor: Max E. Austin x
  • HortScience x
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Is horticulture more popular than jogging? The results of a Don Bowdren Associates survey indicate that 52% of the population is engaged in some form of horticulture, compared to only 27% that jog. These people have discovered what we have long known —that horticulture is everywhere. Horticulture is a science, an art, a profession, a business, an industry, a vocation, an avocation, a way of life involving millions of people! As that way of life changes—and people's needs change—horticulture adapts.

Open Access
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Three field experiments were conducted to determine short- and long-term effects of hydrogel mixed with peatmoss, milled pine bark, or soil on growth and yield of blueberry. Rabbiteye blueberry cultivars (Vaccinium ashei Reade) Delite, Tifblue, and Climax, and southern highbush cultivar (V. corymbosum L.) Georgiagem were used as test plants. Hydrogel mixed with soil was detrimental to plant survival. Hydrogel with or without peatmoss or pine bark did not influence yield or berry weight of 3- to 4-year-old `Delite' and 2- to 3-year-old `Tifblue' plants. The southern highbush, `Georgiagem', grown in peatmoss + hydrogel, produced plants of larger volume than those grown in peatmoss alone. Yield or berry weight was not affected significantly by soil amendments. Genetic differences between cultivars affected growth, yield, and berry weight, but the cultivar x soil treatment interaction was not significant.

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Authors: and

Abstract

Three hundred shoots with flower buds were collected from three blueberry types to determine the influence of chilling hours on flower bud expansion. The three types were rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) ‘Brightwell’ and clone T-110, and low-chill highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum L.) ‘Georgiagem’. Chilling hours in this study ranged from 0 to 700 and were defined as accumulated hours of temperatures < 7.2°C. Flower bud expansion of all three blueberry types was influenced significantly by levels of accumulated chilling. The mathematical relationships between bud width and chilling hours were either linear or quadratic. Largest bud expansion occurred after 400 chilling hours for ‘Brightwell’ and ‘Georgiagem’ and after 550 hr for T-110. Overall, ‘Brightwell’ had the smallest bud width, ‘Georgiagem’ was intermediate, and T-110 the largest.

Open Access

Abstract

Rabbiteye blueberry plants (Vaccinium ashei, Reade) which had been planted in 1947 and fertilized with complete fertilizers until 1962 were neglected for 14 years. Because of the vigorous growth, good foliage color, and quality fruit production of these unfertilized plants, soil and leaf nutrient levels were examined 20 and 21 years after the last fertilization. Whereas the soil pH was optimum at 4.5 both years, the soil P was very high in 1982 and medium in 1983. The soil K was medium in 1982 and low in 1983; the soil Ca and Mg were low both years. Soil micronutrients were low and typical for unfertilized Coastal Plain soils. Generally, all leaf nutrient constituents were on the low end of the ranges reported in the literature. Nonetheless the plants continued to grow and produce well, indicating that some old, deep-rooted rabbiteye blueberry plants require less fertilizer than had been thought previously.

Open Access

Abstract

Rabbiteye blueberry plants (Vaccinium ashei Reade) are generally vigorous and adaptable to a wide range of soil textures. Reduced growth and yield are associated with high soil pH in most instances. Experiments were conducted to elucidate the relationship between soil pH of a sandy clay loam soil and growth yield of 2 rabbiteye cultivars. Yields of ‘Delite’ and ‘Tifblue’ were decreased with increasing pH from 5.1 to 6.3. ‘Delite’ plants had good observed growth and foliage color at soil pH 5.0 to 5.5. Observed growth appeared to decrease and chlorosis increase with increasing pH up to 6.5 Growth of ‘Tifblue’ differed little among the soil pH treatments, because all plants were slightly to severely chlorotic. Higher yields were obtained from ‘Tifblue’ than from ‘Delite’.

Open Access

The possibility of using chlorophyll fluorescence for detecting internal quality of strawberry has been investigated. The mature fruit were marked and stored at 0 and 5 °C for 5, 10, and 15 days. After storage they were placed in the dark for 20 min and fluorescence measurement then was taken at the marked place with a fluorescence probe with a light intensity of 20 μmol·m–2·s–1. Samples were also taken from the marked place for laboratory analysis to determine chlorophyll and total soluble solute content. Firmenss was detected by an Instron Universal Testing Machine taking measurement at the marked section of the fruit. Rot was detected visually. Multiple regression and simple correlation were detected between fluorescence and laboratory-analyzed data. Multiple correlation coefficient (R) ranged from 0.80 to 0.97. Simple correlation (r) ranged from 0.44 to 0.89. The results of this study indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence is capable of detecting internal quality of strawberry and may potentially extend to other fruits. Feasible applications of the method include packinghouse, sorting of fruits, and parent and progeny quality assessment in a strawberry breeding program.

Free access