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  • Author or Editor: Mark Payton x
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Eggplants (Solanum melongena L.) were grown from transplants in a field study at Bixby, Okla., in 2005. Plants were harvested twice a week for 7 weeks. Data were taken from 3 individual plants per plot × 11 cultivars × 3 replications. The open-pollinated `Black Beauty' was inferior to the hybrids for yield and fruit quality. Patterns of cumulative percent marketable fruit number did not differ for 3 of the 4 cultivars producing the numerically highest (not always statistically highest) marketable fruit weights per plant (`Classic', `Nadia', and `Santana'). `Dusky' was the exception; fruit number peaked relatively early, but it still totaled among the highest for marketable fruit weight per plant. This might be considered an efficient fruiting pattern. Apart from `Dusky', a relatively high cumulative percent marketable fruit number throughout the season tended to be associated with an intermediate to low marketable fruit weight per plant. Two factors usually were responsible for this pattern: relatively low average marketable fruit weight, or high cull production. Despite significant differences in individual marketable fruiting patterns and average fruit weights, one relatively simple curvilinear model gave an excellent estimation of total and marketable eggplant fruit production (respectively) over time. The model was pct = 1/(1+exp(-(a+b*day))), where pct = estimated cumulative percent based on number of fruit, a = intercept, and b = slope.

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Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) cover crops were grown in a rotation with sweet corn (Zea mays var. rugosa Bonaf.) and muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. Reticulatus group) to evaluate the legume's ability to remove excess P from soils when poultry litter was used as a fertilizer. Fertilizer treatments were: 1) litter to meet each crop's recommended preplant N requirements (1×); 2) litter at twice the recommended rate (2×); and 3) urea at the 1× rate as the control. Following the vegetable crops, hairy vetch was planted on half of each replication, while the other half was fallowed. The vetch was removed from the field in a simulated haying operation in the spring. Soil samples were taken at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths at the onset of the study and after each crop to monitor plant nutrient concentrations. The vetch sometimes raised soil test N concentrations at the 0-15 cm depth. Soil test P concentrations at the 0-15 cm sampling depth in the vetch system were consistently lower numerically, but not statistically, relative to comparable plots in the fallow system. Soil test P at the 0-15 cm depth was usually increased by litter at the 2× rate relative to the urea control, regardless of cropping system. Yields of both vegetable crops were similar among all cover crop and fertilizer treatments.

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Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] cover crops were grown in a rotation with broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck.), spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), and turnip greens [Brassica rapa L. var. (DC.) Metzg. utilis] to evaluate the legume's ability to remove excess P from soils when poultry litter was used as a fertilizer. Fertilizer treatments were: 1) litter to meet each crop's recommended preplant N requirements (1×); 2) litter at twice the recommended rate (2×); and 3) urea at the 1× rate as the control. Following the vegetable crops, cowpeas were planted on half of each replication, while the other half was fallowed. The cowpeas were harvested at the green-shell seed stage and then underwent a simulated haying operation to remove remaining shoot material from the field. Soil samples were taken at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths at the onset of the study and after each crop to monitor plant nutrient concentrations. The cowpeas lowered soil test N concentrations at both soil sampling depths, but had no consistent effect on soil test P concentrations. Soil test P at the 0-15 cm depth was not increased by litter at the 1× rate but was increased by litter at the 2× rate relative to the urea control, regardless of cropping system. Poultry litter was effective as a fertilizer for all three vegetable crops, but the 1× rate appeared inadequate for maximum production of broccoli and turnip greens.

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Nine nematicide treatments were evaluated from 1993 through 1995 in field experiments on paprika pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Materials tested included a chitinurea soil amendment and six chemicals: fosthiazate, carbofuran, aldicarb, oxamyl, fenamiphos, and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D). Stands at harvest were increased relative to the control by chitin-urea, fosthiazate, and 1,3-D, but only fosthiazate increased marketable fruit yield relative to the control. Aldicarb reduced preharvest nematode populations relative to the control, but aldicarb did not result in a significant fruit yield increase. Chitin-urea was the only treatment to produce a net increase in nematode counts from preplant to preharvest in all three years. Although fosthiazate was promising, nematicide treatments were of limited benefit under the conditions of these studies. Chemical names used: (RS)-S-sec-butyl O-ethyl 2-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-ylphosphonothioate (fosthiazate); 2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate (carbofuran); 2-methyl-2-(methylthio)propionaldehyde O-(methylcarbamoyl)oxime (aldicarb); methyl N′N′ -dimethyl-N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]-1-thiooxamimidate (oxamyl); ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylthio)phenyl(1-methylethyl) phosphoramidate (fenamiphos).

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Nematodes (Meloidogyne sp.) are a potential problem when paprika peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) are grown in fields historically planted to peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.). Nine nematicide treatments were evaluated over 3 years in field experiments on paprika pepper. Materials tested included the chitin nematicide ClandoSan and six chemicals: fosthiazate, carbofuran, aldicarb, oxamyl, fenamiphos, and dichloropropene. Stands at harvest were increased relative to the control by ClandoSan in 2 of 3 years. Other horticultural effects (plant dry mass and fruit yield) were minimal for all nine nematicide treatments. No one nematicide treatment consistently reduced nematode counts at harvest relative to the control. Nematode counts at harvest were greater in plots treated with ClandoSan than in plots treated with any other material in 2 of 3 years. Nematicide treatments were not cost effective under the conditions of these studies.

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