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  • Author or Editor: M.J. Silbernagel x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Irrigation method and row spacing had a significant influence on the quality of fresh, canned, and frozen snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Sprinkle irrigated fresh and canned snap beans contained more ascorbic acid than rill irrigated snap beans. Rill irrigated snap beans had more intense color, lower shear values, less turbid brine, and less drained weight loss. Canned snap beans grown in narrow rows had less drained weight loss than snap beans from wide rows. Frozen snap beans from narrow rows had more drip loss, less moisture, increased soluble solids, and increased ascorbic acid content than those from wide rows. Under the conditions of this study, rill irrigated snap beans and snap beans grown in narrow rows did have quality advantages over sprinkle irrigated snap beans and snap beans grown in wide rows.

Open Access

Abstract

A “seed index” based on the product of seed weight by length was positively correlated with the fiber development of large- and medium-sieved snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) whether fresh or canned. Fresh seed index values which are easier to measure than fiber, can be used to estimate canned product quality rapidly and inexpensively. It is suggested that cultivars be compared for yield, days and/or heat units to harvest maturity, sieve size distribution and quality when at least 95% of the harvested pods are within fancy Grade as determined by the seed index.

Open Access

Abstract

Viability of pollen grains of isogenic sibling bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) selections of known tolerance of sensitivity to high temperatures (HT), as previously determined by pod retention and seed yield, was compared to that of a common parent bean selection and a cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] cultivar. Exposure of newly opened flowers to temperatures of 35° or 41°C reduced the viability of pollen grains in all bean selections. Pollen of all sibling selections was less affected by HT than pollen of their common parent suggesting transgressive segregation of factors for HT tolerance. At 41°, most pollen grains were destroyed in the parent bean selection and the 2 HT-sensitive siblings, whereas 44% to 55% of the pollen grains appeared to be viable in the 2 HT-tolerant siblings. Pollen viability of the HT-tolerant cowpea cultivar was not reduced by temperatures to 41°. Pollen staining indicated an interrelationship between pollen viability and tolerance to HT stress among the bean selections. The technique described has the potential for rapid selection of HT-tolerant genotypes in hybrid populations.

Open Access