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  • Author or Editor: Laurin Wheeler x
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A control burn was conducted in a mixed black oak—white oak—post oak stand to determine the effectiveness of fire at removing midstory and understory trees. The midstory and understory was predominately invading species of red maple, dogwood, black cherry, black gum, and mockernut hickory with lesser amounts of canopy species—black oak, white oak, post oak, and blackjack oak. A total of 17,000 stems/ha were top killed. All stems below 10 cm (15,600 stems/ha) were killed and all of the invading species were all top killed. Large black oak (greater than 20 cm) were killed by hypoxylon which may or may not have been related to fire. Soil pH increased from 4.6 (before) to 5.7 after the burn. The litter layer was almost completely removed. The biomass of the litter layer the year after the burn was 23% of the biomass before burning. Herbaceous plants began to invade the site in the first summer.

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Twelve to 15 year old silver maple and wild cherry trees were top pruned severely to a height of 5m and then trunk injected with Prunit 20g/l at 0, 0.1, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter or were treated with a trunk pour of Prunit 50W at the rate of 0, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter. Treatment effects were not obvious on any trees until 12 months after treatment. After 36 months maples receiving the two highest rates had made less than 50 cm of growth above the pruned top of the tree whereas the untreated control had produced 3 m of new shoot growth. The 0.1 g rate produced less aesthetic disruption to the appearance of the tree and reduced growth to 1.2 m. Wild cherry trees responded similarly but the amount of regrowth following pruning was less. Maple trees receiving the trunk pour treatment exhibited a 50% reduction in new shoot growth 36 months after treatment.

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Twelve to 15 year old silver maple and wild cherry trees were top pruned severely to a height of 5m and then trunk injected with Prunit 20g/l at 0, 0.1, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter or were treated with a trunk pour of Prunit 50W at the rate of 0, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter. Treatment effects were not obvious on any trees until 12 months after treatment. After 36 months maples receiving the two highest rates had made less than 50 cm of growth above the pruned top of the tree whereas the untreated control had produced 3 m of new shoot growth. The 0.1 g rate produced less aesthetic disruption to the appearance of the tree and reduced growth to 1.2 m. Wild cherry trees responded similarly but the amount of regrowth following pruning was less. Maple trees receiving the trunk pour treatment exhibited a 50% reduction in new shoot growth 36 months after treatment.

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